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Primates

, Volume 22, Issue 2, pp 145–160 | Cite as

Variations in group composition and population density of the two sympatric Mentawaian leaf-monkeys

  • Kunio Watanabe
Article

Abstract

The Mentawai snub-nosed langur (Simias concolor) and the Mentawai langur (Presbytis potenziani) were observed on Siberut Island, off the west coast of Sumatra, for about 20 months during 1974–1978. The Mentawai snub-nosed langur was organized into monogamous groups in the major study area, but formed larger polygamous groups in some limited areas. Where larger polygamous groups were observed, the snub-nosed langur was found at an extremely high density. On the other hand, in the area where monogamous groups were observed, they occurred at a low density. Such differences in social organization are discussed in relation to excessive hunting by the natives. Mentawai langurs were found in small monogamous groups throughout the island, a condition never observed in any other known Old World monkeys.

Keywords

Population Density Social Organization West Coast Animal Ecology Limited Area 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Japan Monkey Centre 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kunio Watanabe
    • 1
  1. 1.Primate Research InstituteKyoto UniversityAichiJapan

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