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Primates

, Volume 24, Issue 2, pp 231–240 | Cite as

Palatine fenestrae, the orangutan and hominoid evolution

  • Jeffrey H. Schwartz
Article

Abstract

Although most mammals develop relatively large double anterior palatine fenestrae that patently communicate with the nasal cavity, four extant primates—Homo sapiens, Pongo, Pan andGorilla—do not. While these four have closed-down these foramenal structures,Homo sapiens andPongo are unique in forming a single foramen palatally. Among fossil taxa,Homo, Australopithecus, Sivapithecus (=Ramapithecus) andRudapithecus also develop a single foramen palatally. Dryopithecines, the presumed fossil apes, preserve the two patent fenestrae. In light of dental features that are considered diagnostically “hominid,” which are also found in the orangutan, it is suggested that this “ape,” rather thanPan, is phylogenetically closer toHomo.

Keywords

Nasal Cavity Animal Ecology Fossil Taxon Dental Feature Extant Primate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Japan Monkey Centre 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeffrey H. Schwartz
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Anthropology, Faculty of Arts and SciencesUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA

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