Primates

, Volume 20, Issue 2, pp 301–305 | Cite as

Mother-daughter dominance reversals in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

  • Dennis Chikazawa
  • Thomas P. Gordon
  • Carol A. Bean
  • Irwin S. Bernstein
Short Communications

Abstract

The dominance relations in a newly formed group of rhesus monkeys were monitored routinely for eight years, using as an indicator of relative rank the outcome of dyadic aggressive encounters. These compound-living animals exhibited a stable linear dominance order, with male and female juveniles assuming ranks just below their mothers. In contrast to previous observations, each of the nine females whose first-born was a daughter was bypassed in rank by one or more of her daughters in the daughter's menarchal year. These changes in status have remained stable and are considered permanent. A brief description of a typical rank reversal sequence is provided.

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Copyright information

© Japan Monkey Centre 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dennis Chikazawa
    • 1
  • Thomas P. Gordon
    • 1
  • Carol A. Bean
    • 2
  • Irwin S. Bernstein
    • 2
  1. 1.Yerkes Regional Primate Research CenterEmory UniversityAtlantaU.S.A.
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of GeorgiaAthensU.S.A.

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