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The Journal of Technology Transfer

, Volume 15, Issue 4, pp 31–38 | Cite as

Transfer or generation? Biotechnology and local-industry development

  • Edward J. Blakely
  • Kelvin W. Willoughby
Research

Abstract

This paper examines the local (regional) economic-development aspects of the emerging biotechnology industry and considers the relative importance of generationoriented policies over transfer-oriented policies. Results from a study of the biotechnology industry in California are used to support the analysis. Basically, it was found that there is a complex industrial ecology associated with biotechnology. The firms choose to locate neither randomly nor entirely in order to be close to similar firms. Rather, it appears that they emerge in locations that have a nurturing biotechnology milieu. The presence of a critical biotechnology human-resource base creates its own dynamic, which diffuses into the surrounding medical, electronic, and other related industries. Thus, what develops is a local biotechnology-generation complex. Technology transfer's role seems to be subsidiary to the process of technology generation in the area.

Keywords

Economic Growth Technology Transfer Industrial Organization Technology Management Technology Generation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Technology Transfer Society 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward J. Blakely
    • 1
  • Kelvin W. Willoughby
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of City and Regional Planning at University of California at BerkeleyBerkeleyUSA
  2. 2.the Institute of Urban and Regional Development at University of California at BerkeleyBerkeleyUSA
  3. 3.Graduate School of Management at the University of Western AustraliaAustralia

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