Research in Science Education

, Volume 21, Issue 1, pp 1–9

Mature-age students-how are they different?

  • Ken Appleton
Article
  • 114 Downloads

Abstract

Mature-age students have formed a significant proportion of preservice students in primary teacher education over recent years. Academic staff have reported a difference between mature-age students and school-leavers, particularly in motivation and achievement. This report examines part of a study which explored mature-age students' views about aspects of teaching science and technology, compared to the views of students who came to university straight from school. It examines, in particular, students' personal feelings of adequacy in teaching science and technology in primary schools.

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References

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Copyright information

© Australasian Science Research Association 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ken Appleton
    • 1
  1. 1.School of EducationUniversity of Central QueenslandRockhampton MC

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