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Potato Research

, Volume 36, Issue 2, pp 107–117 | Cite as

The effect of storage temperature on reducing sugar concentration and the activities of three amylolytic enzymes in tubers of the cultivated potato,Solanum tuberosum L.

  • J. E. Cottrell
  • C. M. Duffus
  • L. Paterson
  • G. R. Mackay
  • M. J. Allison
  • H. Bain
Article

Summary

Reducing sugar content, and activities of three starch hydrolysing enzymes, alpha-amylase, beta-amylase and debranching enzyme were measured over several months in tubers of five cultivars stored at 4°C or 10°C. Cultivars differed in their sensitivity to storage temperature. Reducing sugar content of tubers and the activities of three starch hydrolysing enzymes increased sharply during the first weeks of storage at 4°C. At 10°C, reducing sugar content, and the activity of the three enzymes remained constant or increased only slightly.

Additional keywords

low temperature sweetening alpha-amylase beta-amylase debranching enzyme 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. E. Cottrell
    • 1
  • C. M. Duffus
    • 1
  • L. Paterson
    • 1
  • G. R. Mackay
    • 2
  • M. J. Allison
    • 2
  • H. Bain
    • 2
  1. 1.The Scottish Agricultural College (SAC)EdinburghScotland, U.K.
  2. 2.Scottish Crop Research Institute (SCRI)DundeeScotland, U.K.

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