Potato Research

, Volume 40, Issue 4, pp 413–416

Preparative isolation ofSolanum tuberosum L. glycoalkaloids by MPLC

  • S. Soulé
  • A. Vázquez
  • G. González
  • P. Moyna
  • F. Ferreira
Article

Summary

A new, efficient and economic method employing Medium Pressure Liquid Chromatography (MPLC) for the isolation of the two majorSolanum tuberosum L. glycoalkaloids (α-solanine and α-chaconine) is described. Potato peelings are homogenised with 5% acetic acid, the glycoalkaloids purified by filtration through an XAD-2 column and then by precipitation from the aqueous solution. The resulting glycoalkaloid fraction was purified by MPLC using a Silica Gel column and a CHCl3:MeOH:2% NH4OH mixture (70∶30∶5) as mobile phase to yield pure α-chaconine and a-solanine. This methodology can be used to obtain glycoalkaloids for enthomology and toxicological research where large amounts of these compounds are required.

Additional keywords

α-chaconine α-solanine potato 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Soulé
    • 1
  • A. Vázquez
    • 1
  • G. González
    • 1
  • P. Moyna
    • 1
  • F. Ferreira
    • 1
  1. 1.Facultad de QuímicaCátedra de Farmacognosia y Productos NaturalesMontevideoUruguay

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