Human Genetics

, Volume 97, Issue 6, pp 714–719 | Cite as

Allelic association between a Ser-9-Gly polymorphism in the dopamine D3 receptor gene and schizophrenia

  • S. Shaikh
  • D. A. Collier
  • P. C. Sham
  • D. Ball
  • K. Aitchison
  • H. Vallada
  • R. W. Kerwin
  • I. Smith
  • M. Gill
Original Investigation

Abstract

We examined a Ser-9-Gly polymorphism in the dopamine D3 receptor gene for allelic association with schizophrenia in 133 patients currently treated with clozapine and 109 controls. Allele 1 (Ser-9) was significantly more frequent in the patients (69%) than in the controls (56%) (P = 0.004). The 1-1 genotype was more common (43% vs 30%) and the 2-2 genotype less common (5% vs 18%) in patients than in controls. When the patient group was subdivided on the basis of clinical response to clozapine, using a 20-point improvement in the global assessment scale as cut-off, genotype 1-1 was found to be more frequent among the non-responders (53% vs 36%,P = 0.04). To place our results in the context of previous studies of this polymorphism and schizophrenia, we performed a meta-analysis of all published data including the present sample. The combined analysis shows evidence for a modest association between genotype 1-1 and schizophrenia (odds ratio 1.25, 95% confidence interval 1.05–1:49,P = 0.01). These results suggest that the Ser-9 allele, or a nearby polymorphism in linkage disequilibrium, results in a small increase in susceptibility to schizophrenia.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Shaikh
    • 1
  • D. A. Collier
    • 1
    • 2
  • P. C. Sham
    • 1
    • 3
  • D. Ball
    • 1
  • K. Aitchison
    • 1
  • H. Vallada
    • 1
  • R. W. Kerwin
    • 1
  • I. Smith
    • 4
  • M. Gill
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Psychological MedicineInstitute of PsychiatryDenmark HillUK
  2. 2.Department of NeuropathologyInstitute of PsychiatryDenmark HillUK
  3. 3.Department of Biostatistics and ComputingInstitute of PsychiatryDenmark HillUK
  4. 4.Gartnaval Royal HospitalGlasgowUK
  5. 5.Department of Psychiatry, Trinity Centre for Health SciencesSt James' HospitalDublinIreland

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