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Validation of automated oscillometric sphygmomanometer (HDBPM) for arterial pressure measurement during haemodialysis

  • S. CavalcantiEmail author
  • G. Marchesi
  • C. Ghidini
Article

Abstract

An HDBPM oscillometric sphygmomanometer used for the automatic measurement of arterial blood pressure is evaluated according to the ANSI/AAMI SP10-1992 standard. The accuracy of the HDBPM is ascertained by comparing it against the standard Riva-Rocci ascultatory method. Following the ascultatory method, two independent observers use the HDBPM devise to simultaneously measure the arterial blood pressure in 92 subjects of varying ages and having different blood pressures and arm sizes. High agreement is found when comparing the observers' pressure determinations (within 10 mmHg for 100% of observations). Correlation between the average of two ascultatory determinations and the HDBPM is high both for the systolic (r=0.98) and diastolic (r=0.94) pressures. The mean of the differences between the pressures measured by the observers and the HDBPM device are 0.2 mmHg (systolic) and −0.4 mmHg (diastolic). The percentages of readings within 10 mmHg between those taken by the observers and those taken by the HDBPM are 88% (systolic) and 97% (diastolic). These results largely satisfy current requirements.

Keywords

Blood pressure Device accuracy Monitoring Artificial kidney AAMI standard BHS protocol 

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Copyright information

© IFMBE 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Biomedical Engineering Laboratory, Department of Electronics, Computer Science and SystemsUniversity of BolognaItaly

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