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Plant Cell, Tissue and Organ Culture

, Volume 47, Issue 2, pp 97–101 | Cite as

Effects of PEG-induced water stress onin vitro hardening of ‘Valiant’ grape

  • Imed Dami
  • Harrison G. Hughes
Original Research Papers

Abstract

Polyethylene glycol was added to the rooting medium ofmicropropagated grape shoots to induce water stress. At the end of the rooting stage, plantlets treated with 2% polyethylene glycol were compared with untreated control plantlets and greenhouse-grown plants. Leaves of treated plantlets had the highest deposition of epicuticular wax, followed by those of the greenhouse and control. Stomatal index did not vary among treatments. However, differences in leaf epidermal cell configuration were observed among treatments. The morphological changes of treated plantlets, including substantial deposition of epicuticular wax and modified leaf surface anatomy were associated with increasedex vitro survival after four weeks in the greenhouse.

Key words

acclimatization epidermal cell shape in vitro stomatal index 

Abbreviations

GH

greenhouse

PEG

polyethylene glycol

EC

epidermal cells

EW

epicuticular wax

MW

molecular weight

Sl

stomatal index

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Imed Dami
    • 1
  • Harrison G. Hughes
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of HorticultureColorado State UniversityFort CollinsUSA

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