Advertisement

Psychometrika

, Volume 28, Issue 4, pp 315–331 | Cite as

Beyond Babbage

  • Lyle V. Jones
Article

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. [1]
    Abelson, R. P. Simulation of “hot” cognition. In S. S. Tomkins and S. Messick (Eds.),Computer simulation of personality. New York: Wiley, 1963.Google Scholar
  2. [2]
    Adams, J. A. and Webber, C. E. Monte Carlo model of tracking behavior.Human Factors, 1963,5, 81–102.Google Scholar
  3. [3]
    Bachrach, A. J., Banghard, F. W., and Pattishall, E. G. Comments on the diagnostician as computer.Neuropsychiatry, 1960,6, 30–39.Google Scholar
  4. [4]
    Baker, F. B. Information retrieval based upon latent class analysis.J. Ass. comput. Mach., 1962,9, 512–521.Google Scholar
  5. [5]
    Bock, R. D. Programming univariate and multivariate analysis of variance.Technometrics, 1963,5, 95–117.Google Scholar
  6. [6]
    Boring, E. G. Mind and mechanism.Amer. J. Psychol., 1946,59, 173–192.Google Scholar
  7. [7]
    Borko, H. (Ed.)Computer applications in the behavioral sciences. Englewood Cliffs, N. J.: Prentice-Hall, 1962.Google Scholar
  8. [8]
    Bush, R. R. and Mosteller, F.Stochastic models for learning. New York: Wiley, 1955.Google Scholar
  9. [9]
    Bush, R. R. and Mosteller, F. A comparison of eight models. In R. R. Bush and W. K. Estes (Eds.),Studies in mathematical learning theory. Stanford: Stanford Univ. Press, 1959. Pp. 293–307.Google Scholar
  10. [10]
    Cheatham, T. E., Jr. and Warshall, S. Translation of retrieval requests couched in a “semiformal” English-like language.Commun. Ass. comput. Mach., 1962,5, 34–39.Google Scholar
  11. [11]
    Colby, K. M. Computer simulation of a neurotic process. In S. S. Tomkins and S. Messick (Eds.),Computer simulation of personality. New York: Wiley, 1963. Pp. 165–180.Google Scholar
  12. [12]
    Coulson, J. E.Programmed learning and computer-based instruction. New York: Wiley, 1962.Google Scholar
  13. [13]
    Delavenay, E.An introduction to machine translation. New York: Praeger, 1960.Google Scholar
  14. [14]
    Edmundson, H. P. (Ed.)Proceedings of the National Symposium on Machine Translation. Englewood Cliffs, N. J.: Prentice-Hall, 1961.Google Scholar
  15. [15]
    Ehrenfeld, S. and Ben-Tuvia, S. The efficiency of statistical simulation procedures.Technometrics, 1962,4, 257–275.Google Scholar
  16. [16]
    Fairthorne, R. A.Towards information retrieval. London: Butterworths, 1961.Google Scholar
  17. [17]
    Feigenbaum, E. A. and Simon, H. A. Performance of a reading task by an elementary perceiving and memorizing program.Behav. Sci., 1963,8, 72–76.Google Scholar
  18. [18]
    Feldman, J. Simulation of behavior in the binary choice experiment.Proc. west. joint comput. Conf., 1961,19, 133–144.Google Scholar
  19. [19]
    Fillenbaum, S., Jones, L. V., and Wepman, J. M. Some linguistic features of speech from aphasic patients.Language and Speech, 1961,4, 91–108.Google Scholar
  20. [20]
    Gorn, S. On the mechanical simulation of habit-forming and learning.Information and Control, 1959,2, 226–259.Google Scholar
  21. [21]
    Green, B. F., Jr. Using computers to study human perception.Educ. psychol. Measmt, 1961,21, 227–233.Google Scholar
  22. [22]
    Green, B. F., Jr.Digital computers in research. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1963.Google Scholar
  23. [23]
    Green, B. F., Jr., Wolf, A. K., Chomsky, C., and Laughery, K. Baseball: an automatic question-answerer.Proc. west. joint comput. Conf., 1961,19, 219–224.Google Scholar
  24. [24]
    Guilford, J. P. An informational view of mind.J. psychol. Researches, 1962,6, 1–10.Google Scholar
  25. [25]
    Harman, H. H. Simulation: a survey.Proc. west. joint comput. Conf., 1961,19, 1–9.Google Scholar
  26. [26]
    Harris, Z. S.String analysis of sentence structure. The Hague: Mouton, 1962.Google Scholar
  27. [27]
    Healy, M. J. R. Programming multiple regression.Comput. J., 1963,6, 57–61.Google Scholar
  28. [28]
    Horst, P., Dvorak, A., and Wright, C. Computer application to psychological problems.Educ. psychol. Measmt, 1961,21, 699–719.Google Scholar
  29. [29]
    Hunt, E. B.Concept learning: An information processing problem. New York: Wiley, 1962.Google Scholar
  30. [30]
    Johnson, E. S. The simulation of human problem solving from an empirically derived model. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Univ. North Carolina, 1961.Google Scholar
  31. [31]
    Jones, L. V., Goodman, M. F., and Wepman, J. M. The classification of parts of speech for the characterization of aphasia.Language and Speech, 1963,6, 94–107.Google Scholar
  32. [32]
    Kelly, E. L. and Lingoes, J. C. Data processing in psychological research. In Borko, H. (Ed.),Computer applications in the behavioral sciences. Englewood Cliffs, N. J.: Prentice-Hall, 1962. Pp. 172–199.Google Scholar
  33. [33]
    Kent, A.Information retrieval and machine translation. Vol. III, Part 1. New York: Interscience, 1960.Google Scholar
  34. [34]
    Kent, A.Information retrieval and machine translation. Vol. III, Part 2. New York: Interscience, 1961.Google Scholar
  35. [35]
    Klein, S. and Simmons, R. F. A computational approach to grammatical coding of English words.J. Ass. comput. Mach., 1963,10, 334–347.Google Scholar
  36. [36]
    Kleinmuntz, B. A portrait of the computer as a young clinician.Behav. Sci., 1963,8, 154–156.Google Scholar
  37. [37]
    Laughery, K. R. and Gregg, L. W. Simulation of human problem-solving behavior.Psychometrika, 1962,27, 265–282.Google Scholar
  38. [38]
    Licklider, J. C. R. and Clark, W. E. On-line man-computer communication.Proc. Amer. Fed. info. process. Societies, 1962,22, 113–128.Google Scholar
  39. [39]
    Lipetz, L. E. Bionics.Science, 1963,140, 1419–1426.Google Scholar
  40. [40]
    Margulies, S. and Eigen, L. D. (Eds.)Applied program instruction. New York: Wiley, 1962.Google Scholar
  41. [41]
    Miller, G. A. The study of intelligent behavior. InProceedings of a Harvard symposium on digital computers and their applications. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Univ. Press, 1962. Pp. 7–22.Google Scholar
  42. [42]
    Miller, G. A., Galanter, E., and Pribram, K.Plans and the structure of behavior. New York: Holt, 1960.Google Scholar
  43. [43]
    Minsky, M. Steps toward artificial intelligence.Proc. Inst. radio Engineers, 1961,49, 8–30.Google Scholar
  44. [44]
    Morrison, P. and Morrison, E.Charles Babbage and his calculating engines. New York: Dover, 1961.Google Scholar
  45. [45]
    Mosteller, F. and Wallace, D. L. Inference in an authorship problem.J. Amer. statist. Ass., 1963,58, 275–309.Google Scholar
  46. [46]
    Newell, A. (Ed.)Information processing language-V manual. Englewood Cliffs, N. J.: Prentice-Hall, 1961.Google Scholar
  47. [47]
    Newell, A., Shaw, J. C., and Simon, H. A. A variety of intelligent learning in a general problem solver. In M. T. Yovits and S. Cameron (Eds.),Self-organizing systems. New York: Pergamon, 1960. Pp. 153–189.Google Scholar
  48. [48]
    Newell, A., Shaw, J. C., and Simon, H. A. Empirical explorations of the logic theory machine.Proc. west. joint comput. Conf., 1957,11, 218–230.Google Scholar
  49. [49]
    Newell, A. and Simon, H. A. The logic theory machine.Trans. inform. Theory, 1956,IT-2, 61–70.Google Scholar
  50. [50]
    Newell, A. and Simon, H. A. Computers in psychology. In R. D. Luce, R. R. Bush, and E. Galanter (Eds.),Handbook of mathematical psychology. Vol. I. New York: Wiley, 1963. Pp. 361–428.Google Scholar
  51. [51]
    Newman, E. B. Paracomputers in psychological research. InProceedings of a Harvard symposium on digital computers and their applications. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Univ. Press, 1962. Pp. 239–251.Google Scholar
  52. [52]
    Newman, S. N. Information retrieval, toward an ultimate universal system.Revue internat. Doc., 1962,29, 97–99.Google Scholar
  53. [53]
    Oettinger, A. G.Automatic language translation. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Univ. Press, 1960.Google Scholar
  54. [54]
    Osgood, C. E. and Miron, M. S. (Eds.)Approaches to the study of aphasia. Urbana: Univ. Illinois Press, 1963. Pp. 127–130.Google Scholar
  55. [55]
    Overall, J. E. A configural analysis of psychiatric diagnostic stereotypes.Behav. Sci., 1963,8, 211–219.Google Scholar
  56. [56]
    Overall, J. E. and Gorham, D. R. A pattern probability model for the classification of psychiatric patients.Behav. Sci., 1963,8, 108–116.Google Scholar
  57. [57]
    Peirce, C. S. Logical machines.Amer. J. Psychol., 1887,1, 165–170.Google Scholar
  58. [58]
    Rapoport, A. A study of human decisions in a computer-controlled task. Chapel Hill, N. C.: Psychometric Laboratory Report No. 36, Aug., 1963.Google Scholar
  59. [59]
    Shepard, R. N. The analysis of proximities: Multidimensional scaling with an unknown distance function: I.Psychometrika, 1962,27, 125–140.Google Scholar
  60. [60]
    Shepard, R. N. The analysis of proximities: Multidimensional scaling with an unknown distance function: II.Psychometrika, 1962,27, 219–246.Google Scholar
  61. [61]
    Silberman, H. F. and Coulson, J. E. Automated teaching. In H. Borko (Ed.),Computer applications in the behavioral sciences. Englewood Cliffs, N. J.: Prentice-Hall, 1962. Pp. 308–335.Google Scholar
  62. [62]
    Simmons, P. L. and Simmons, R. F. The simulation of cognitive processes: an annotated bibliography.Inst. radio Engineers Transac. electr. Comput., 1961,EC-10, 462–483.Google Scholar
  63. [63]
    Simmons, P. L. and Simmons, R. F. The simulation of cognitive processes, II: an annotated bibliography.Inst. radio Engineers Transac. electr. Comput., 1962,EC-11, 535–552.Google Scholar
  64. [64]
    Simmons, R. F., Klein, S., and McConlogue, K. Toward the synthesis of human language behavior.Behav. Sci., 1962,7, 402–407.Google Scholar
  65. [65]
    Smith, H., Gnanadesikan, R., and Hughes, J. B. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA).Biometrics, 1962,18, 22–41.Google Scholar
  66. [66]
    Smith, R. E. Examination by computer.Behav. Sci., 1963,8, 76–79.Google Scholar
  67. [67]
    Stark, L., Payne, R., and Okabe, Y. Online digital computer for measurement of a neurological control system.Commun. Ass. comput. Mach., 1962,5, 567–568.Google Scholar
  68. [68]
    Stone, P. J., Bales, R. F., Namenwirth, J. Z. and Ogilvie, D. M. The general inquirer: a computer system for content analysis and retrieval based on the sentence as a unit of information.Behav. Sci., 1962,7, 484–498.Google Scholar
  69. [69]
    Suppes, P. and Atkinson, R. C.Markov learning models for multiperson interactions. Stanford: Stanford Univ. Press, 1960.Google Scholar
  70. [70]
    Swanson, D. R. Interrogating a computer in natural language.Proc. Internat. Fed. Info. Process. Congress, 1962,62, 124–127.Google Scholar
  71. [71]
    Tobach, E., Schneirla, T. C., and Aronson, L. R. The ATSL: An observer-to-computer system for a multivariate approach to behavioral study.Nature, London, 1962,194, 257–258.Google Scholar
  72. [72]
    Tomkins, S. S. and Messick, S. (Eds.)Computer simulation of personality. New York: Wiley, 1963.Google Scholar
  73. [73]
    Tryon, R. C. BC TRY system of multidimensional analysis. Dept. of Psychology, Univ. California, Berkeley, Oct., 1962, (ditto).Google Scholar
  74. [74]
    Tucker, L. R. Psychometric theory: general and specific.Psychometrika, 1955,20, 267–271.Google Scholar
  75. [75]
    Turing, A. M. On computable numbers, with an application to the Entscheidungs-problem.Proc. London math. Soc., 1937, Ser. 2,42, 230–265.Google Scholar
  76. [76]
    Turing, A. M. Computing machinery and intelligence.Mind, 1950,59, 433–460. Reprinted as “Can a machine think?” in J. R. Newman (Ed.),The world of mathematics. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1956. Pp. 2099–2123.Google Scholar
  77. [77]
    Vandenberg, S. G., Green, B. F., and Wrigley, C. F. A survey of computer usage in departments of psychology and sociology.Behav. Sci., 1962,7, 108–110.Google Scholar
  78. [78]
    Vickery, B. C.On retrieval system theory. London: Butterworths, 1961.Google Scholar
  79. [79]
    von Neumann, J. The general and logical theory of automata. In Jeffress, L. A.,Cerebral mechanisms in behavior. New York: Wiley, 1951. Reprinted in J. R. Newman (Ed.),The world of mathematics. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1956. Pp. 2070–2098.Google Scholar
  80. [80]
    von Neumann, J.The computer and the brain. New Haven: Yale Univ. Press, 1958.Google Scholar
  81. [81]
    Ward, J. H. and Hook, M. E. Use of regression analysis and electronic computers in the prediction of coronary artery disease.Behav. Sci., 1961,7, 120–126.Google Scholar
  82. [82]
    Watanabe, S. Information-theoretical aspects of inductive and deductive inference.IBM J. res. Develop., 1960,4, 208–231.Google Scholar
  83. [83]
    White, B. W. Studies in perception. In H. Borko (Ed.),Computer applications in the behavioral sciences. Englewood Cliffs, N. J.: Prentice-Hall, 1962. Pp. 281–305.Google Scholar
  84. [84]
    Wiesen, R. A. and Shuford, E. H. Bayes strategies as adaptive behavior. In E. E. Bernard and M. R. Kare (Eds.),Biological prototypes and synthetic systems. Vol. I. New York: Plenum, 1962, Pp. 303–310.Google Scholar
  85. [85]
    Yngve, V. H. Computer programs for translation.Sci. Amer., 1962,206, 68–87.Google Scholar
  86. [86]
    Yntema, D. B. and Klem, L. Telling a computer how to evaluate alternatives as one would evaluate them himself.First Congr. inform. syst. Sciences, 1962, Sess.4, 21–36.Google Scholar
  87. [87]
    Yntema, D. B. and Torgerson, W. S. Man-computer cooperation in decisions requiring common sense.Inst. radio Engineers Trans. on hum. Factors in Electron., 1961, HFE-2, 20–26.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Psychometric Society 1963

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lyle V. Jones
    • 1
  1. 1.University of North CarolinaUSA

Personalised recommendations