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Digestive Diseases and Sciences

, Volume 40, Issue 7, pp 1531–1537 | Cite as

Urinary organ specific neoantigen

A potentially diagnostic test for colorectal cancer
  • Martin Tobi
  • Elizabeth Darmon
  • Paul Rozen
  • Nurit Harpaz
  • Aron Fink
  • Benedict Maliakkal
  • Allan Halline
  • Sohrab Mobarhan
  • Zvi Bentwich
Gastrointestinal Oncology

Abstract

Urinary organ-specific neoantigen from colorectal cancer patients has been used to make a monoclonal antibody, BAC 18.1. In this study we assessed the potential of this antibody for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer. We evaluated binding in both urine and effluent samples and compared it with effluent carcinoembryonic antigen standardized for both volume (nanograms per milliliter) and protein. Urinary organ-specific antigen as detected by BAC 18.1 was significantly greater in 29 cancer patients (A405:0.717±0.500) vs 27 controls [0.121 ±0.273 (P<0.05)]. Considerable overlap of binding of BAC 18.1 was observed in the colonic effluent of patients with CRC (N=13), adenomas (N=26), inflammatory bowel disease (N=8), or having a normal colonoscopic examination (N=24). CEA levels (nanograms per milliliter) were significantly elevated in the effluent samples of patients with a past history of colorectal cancer, as compared to that of normal individuals (P<0.05). The presence of the Mr 30,000 organ-specific neoantigen in colonic effluent was also demonstrated by western blot. Organ-specific neoantigen originates in the colon and is excreted into the urine, so the BAC 18.1 binding levels in the urine may be a diagnostic aid for CRC.

Key Words

monoclonal antibody colorectal cancer leukocyte adherence inhibition carcinoembryonic antigen 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin Tobi
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  • Elizabeth Darmon
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  • Paul Rozen
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  • Nurit Harpaz
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  • Aron Fink
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  • Benedict Maliakkal
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  • Allan Halline
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  • Sohrab Mobarhan
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  • Zvi Bentwich
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of GastroenterologyTel Aviv Medical CenterTel AvivIsrael
  2. 2.The Ben-Ari Immunological InstituteKaplan HospitalRehovotIsrael
  3. 3.Division of Gastroenterology, Department of MedicineWayne State University Medical School, Harper HospitalDetroit
  4. 4.Division of GastroenterologyUniversity of Illinois at ChicagoChicago
  5. 5.Loyola University Medical CenterMaywood

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