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A case report of naltrexone treatment of self-injury and social withdrawal in autism

  • Anne S. Walters
  • Rowland P. Barrett
  • Carl Feinstein
  • Arthur Mercurio
  • William T. Hole
Article

Abstract

The endogenous opiate release theory of self-injurious behavior (SIB) was investigated through double-blind placebo-controlled administration of naltrexone hydrochloride (Trexan ®) to a 14-year-old autistic and mentally retarded male for treatment of severe SIB. Results yielded a marked decrease in SIB during two phases of active drug treatment, though SIB did not revert to originally observed placebo levels during a second placebo phase. An increase in social relatedness also was observed during phases of active drug treatment. Opiate theories of self-injury and the possible interrelationship of self-injury with pituitary-adrenal arousal and with social relatedness are discussed.

Keywords

Placebo Hydrochloride Drug Treatment Social Relatedness School Psychology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anne S. Walters
    • 1
  • Rowland P. Barrett
    • 1
  • Carl Feinstein
    • 1
  • Arthur Mercurio
    • 1
  • William T. Hole
    • 1
  1. 1.Emma Pendleton Bradley HospitalBrown University Program in MedicineUSA

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