Glucose metabolism in the caudate nuclei of patients with eating disorders, measured by PET

  • J. -C. Krieg
  • V. Holthoff
  • W. Schreiber
  • K. M. Pirke
  • K. Herholz
Original Articles

Summary

Regional cerebral glucose metabolism was measured with18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose and positron emission tomography in nine patients with bulimia nervosa and in seven patients with anorexia nervosa. Relative caudate glucose metabolism (caudate glucose metabolism divided by global cerebral glucose metabolism) was significantly higher in anorexia nervosa than in bulimia nervosa, suggesting that caudate hyperactivity is characteristic of the anorexic state. Whether increased caudate function is a consequence of anorexic behaviour or whether it is directly involved in the pathogenesis of anorexia nervosa is an issue still to be clarified.

Key words

Bulimia nervosa Anorexia nervosa Caudate nuclei Glucose metabolism Positron emission tomography 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. -C. Krieg
    • 1
  • V. Holthoff
    • 2
  • W. Schreiber
    • 1
  • K. M. Pirke
    • 1
  • K. Herholz
  1. 1.Clinical InstituteMax Planck Institute for PsychiatryMunichFederal Republic of Germany
  2. 2.Max Planck Institute for Neurological ResearchCologneFederal Republic of Germany

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