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Computers and the Humanities

, Volume 29, Issue 5, pp 375–387 | Cite as

Intelligent computer-assisted language learning: A bibliography

  • Alan Bailin
Article

Abstract

This bibliography focuses on works discussing intelligent computer-assisted language learning (ICALL). It includes over 200 entries divided into three sections: (1) collections, special issues and bibliographies, (2) general/theoretical works, (3) specific applications.

Key words

intelligent computer-assisted language learning intelligent computer-assisted language instruction ICALI ICALL computer-assisted language learning computer-assisted language instruction CALL CALI language learning second language learning foreign language learning writing instruction computer-aided writing artificial intelligence intelligent tutoring systems ITS 

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2. Collections, Special Issues and Bibliographies

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General/Theoretical Works

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Specific Applications

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan Bailin
    • 1
  1. 1.Effective WritingThe University of Western OntarioLondonCanada

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