Human Genetics

, Volume 94, Issue 1, pp 69–73 | Cite as

Chromosomal mapping of human adenylyl cyclase genes type III, type V and type VI

  • N. Haber
  • D. Stengel
  • N. Defer
  • N. Roeckel
  • M. -G. Mattei
  • J. Hanoune
Original Investigation

Abstract

Adenylyl cyclase activity plays a central role in the regulation of most cellular processes. At least eight different adenylyl cyclases have been identified, which are endowed with various and sometimes opposing regulatory properties. Recently we have localized the human genes encoding two of these adenylyl cyclases: the gene for type 11 adenylyl cyclase is located on chromosome 2 (sub-band 2p15.3), the gene for type VIII is located on chromosome 8 (sub-band 8824.2). More recently the type I gene has been located on chromosome 7 (sub-band 7pl2–7p13). Using in situ hybridization, we have now localized the genes for three other adenylyl cyclases: the type III gene has been localized on chromosome 2 in the sub-band 2p22–2p24, the type V gene on chromosome 3 at position 3q13.2–3q21, and the type VI gene on chromosome 12 at position 12q12–12q13. It therefore appears that all adenylyl cyclase genes, known at present are located on different chromosomes and thus are likely to be independently regulated.

Abbreviations

AC

adenylyl cyclase

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Haber
    • 1
  • D. Stengel
    • 1
  • N. Defer
    • 1
  • N. Roeckel
    • 2
  • M. -G. Mattei
    • 2
  • J. Hanoune
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, U-99Hopital Henri MondorCréteilFrance
  2. 2.Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, U-242Hopital d'Enfants de La TimoneMarseille Cedex 5France

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