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Getting started: Charles Darwin's early steps toward a creative life in science

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Abstract

Charles Darwin's original and important contributions to science resulted from commitment, persistence, and hard work throughout his adult life. How, when, and where Darwin developed these prerequisites for creative thinking is the focus of this paper. Using a cognitive case study approach to examine the rich record of Darwin's life and work indicates that the 1 ½ years he spent in Edinburgh as a medical student when he was 16–18 years old was the major turning point in his transformation from a hobbyist into a scientist. Darwin first found hisvoice in science in Edinburgh during late adolescence.

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Correspondence to Dr. Robert T. Keegan.

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Keegan, R.T. Getting started: Charles Darwin's early steps toward a creative life in science. J Adult Dev 3, 7–20 (1996). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02265136

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Key words

  • Darwin
  • creativity
  • case study
  • development
  • biography