Journal of Biomedical Science

, Volume 9, Issue 4, pp 359–364 | Cite as

Abnormal measles-mumps-rubella antibodies and CNS autoimmunity in children with autism

  • Vijendra K. Singh
  • Sheren X. Lin
  • Elizabeth Newell
  • Courtney Nelson
Original Paper

Abstract

Autoimmunity to the central nervous system (CNS), especially to myelin basic protein (MBP), may play a causal role in autism, a neurodevelopmental disorder. Because many autistic children harbor elevated levels of measles antibodies, we conducted a serological study of measlesmumps-rubella (MMR) and MBP autoantibodies. Using serum samples of 125 autistic children and 92 control children, antibodies were assayed by ELISA or immunoblotting methods. ELISA analysis showed a significant increase in the level of MMR antibodies in autistic children. Immunoblotting analysis revealed the presence of an unusual MMR antibody in 75 of 125 (60%) autistic sera but not in control sera. This antibody specifically detected a protein of 73–75 kD of MMR. This protein band, as analyzed with monoclonal antibodies, was immuno-positive for measles hemagglutinin (HA) protein but not for measles nucleoprotein and rubella or mumps viral proteins. Thus the MMR antibody in autistic sera detected measles HA protein, which is unique to the measles subunit of the vaccine. Furthermore, over 90% of MMR antibody-positive autistic sera were also positive for MBP autoantibodies, suggesting a strong association between MMR and CNS autoimmunity in autism. Stemming from this evidence, we suggest that an inappropriate antibody response to MMR, specifically the measles component thereof, might be related to pathogenesis of autism.

Key Words

Autoantibodies Autism Autoimmunity Measles virus Measles-mumps-rubella antibodies Vaccines 

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Copyright information

© National Science Council 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vijendra K. Singh
    • 1
  • Sheren X. Lin
    • 1
  • Elizabeth Newell
    • 1
  • Courtney Nelson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biology and Biotechnology CenterUtah State UniversityLoganUSA

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