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American Journal of Dance Therapy

, Volume 8, Issue 1, pp 46–66 | Cite as

Dance/movement therapy in the rehabilitation of individuals surviving severe head injuries

  • Cynthia F. Berrol
  • Stephanie S. Katz
Article

Abstract

Approximately 700,000 individuals are admitted to hospitals annually as a result of severe brain injuries. Of the survivors, upwards of 70,000 suffer pervasive, long-term disruption of all domains of human function and marked alteration of the quality of life. Effective treatment requires a well-orchestrated multidisciplinary team approach. This paper will address rehabilitation issues in relation to dance/movement therapy. First the pathological consequences of neurotrauma will be reviewed. Likewise, basic mechanisms of recovery, treatment principles and special therapeutic considerations will be addressed. Finally, intervention strategies will be discussed within the context of both group and individual settings and illustrated via case studies.

Keywords

Intervention Strategy Effective Treatment Brain Injury Social Psychology Health Psychology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Reference notes

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    Generelli, T.Recent Developments in Acute Pathophysiology of Head Injury. Paper presented at Braintree Hospital's Fifth Annual Traumatic Head Injury Conference, Boston, Mass., October, 1984.Google Scholar
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    Berrol, S.Coma Management in Perspective. Paper presented at Braintree Hospital's Fifth Annual Traumatic Head Injury Conference, Boston, Mass., October, 1984.Google Scholar
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    Di Joseph, L.Traumatic Head Injury: Mechanisms of Recovery. Workshop presented at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center's Third Head Injury Conference, “Coma to Community,” San Jose, Cal., 1981.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Hamlin, M. & Katz, S.The Synergistic Effect of Coordinating Psychotherapy and Dance/Movement Therapy. Paper presented at Braintree Hospital's Fifth Annual Traumatic Head Injury Conference, Boston, Mass., October, 1984.Google Scholar

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Copyright information

© American Dance Therapy Association, Inc. 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cynthia F. Berrol
    • 1
  • Stephanie S. Katz
    • 2
  1. 1.Dance/Movement TherapyCalifornia State UniversityHayward
  2. 2.Dance/Movement Therapist, Therapeutic Recovery ProgramRehabilitation Resources, Inc.Southfield

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