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An exploratory study of the use of cotherapy in dance/movement therapy

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Abstract

Although cotherapy is a modality widely used in the training and practice of dance/movement therapists, there is little literature on cotherapy in dance/movement therapy. Through the use of a questionnaire, this author conducted an exploratory, descriptive study on the general use of coleading in the dance/movement therapy modality and the opinions of dance/movement therapists on this usage. The questionnaire was sent out to 300 dance/movement therapists at the second level of registry (ADTR) nationwide. This study found dance/movement therapists trained partly by coleading reported a higher perceived success rate in cotherapy relationships than those who were not. Also found, the perceived success rate of the cotherapy relationship is higher in dance/movement therapy groups than in other listed psychotherapy groups.

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Additional information

The author wishes to thank Sharon Goodill ADTR and John Burt for their contributions to this research.

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Hudson, K.A. An exploratory study of the use of cotherapy in dance/movement therapy. Am J Dance Ther 17, 25–43 (1995). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02251324

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Keywords

  • Success Rate
  • Social Psychology
  • Health Psychology
  • Therapy Group
  • Exploratory Study