Tropical Animal Health and Production

, Volume 28, Issue 1, pp 23–39 | Cite as

Studies on helminthosis at the centre for tropical veterinary medicine (CTVM)

  • L. J. S. Harrison
  • J. A. Hammond
  • M. M. H. Sewell
Article

Summary

The research work relating to helminths, which has been conducted within the Helminthology Section of the CTVM, often in collaboration with colleagues from the tropics is reviewed and placed into a historical perspective. The research has, in the main, concentrated on the trematodesFasciola hepatica andFasciola gigantica and the cestodesTaenia saginata andTaenia solium, but work on other parasites including gastro-intestinal nematodes is also considered. All of these parasites are of obvious veterinary/economic importance particularly in the tropics and subtropics. While the zoonotic importance ofT. saginata andT. solium has been recognised for many years, it is only more recently that the zoonotic impact ofFasciola spp. has been generally acknowledged.

Etudes Sur Les Helminthiases A CTVM

Résumé

Le travail de recherche portant sur les helminthes, qui a été mené dans le groupe Helminthologie à CTVM, souvent en collaboration avec des collègues des pays tropicaux, est passé en revue et mis dans une perspective historique. La recherche a principalement porté sur les trematodesFasciola hepatica etFasciola gigantica et sur les cestodesTaenia saginata etTaenia solium, cependant d'autres travaux ont également porté sur d'autres parasites et sur des nématodes gastro-intestinaux.

Tous ces parasites sont d'une importance économique/vétérinaire évidente et ceci particulièrement dans les pays tropicaux et sub-tropicaux. Tandis que l'importance deT. saginata etT. solium, sur la zoonose, a toujours été reconnue, ce n'est que récemment que l'impact deFasciola spp sur la zoonose a été repertorié.

Estudios Sobre Enfermedades Causadas Por Helmintos En El CTVM

Resumen

El artículo revisa y sitúa en una perspectiva histórica la investigación sobre helmintos realizada en la sección de helmintología del CTVM, a menudo en colaboración con otros investigadores de países tropicales. La investigación se ha centrado principalmente en los trematodosFasciola hepatica y Fasciola gigantica y en los cestodosTaenia saginata y Taenia solium, aunque en el artículo se incluye también el trabajo realizado con nematodos gastrointestinales y otros parásitos. Todos los parásitos mencionados tienen una importancia obvia desde el punto de vista veterinario y económico, particularmente en los trópicos y subtrópicos. Mientras que la importancia deT. saginata yT. solium como zoonosis ha sido siempre reconocida, el posible carácter zoonótico deFasciola spp. ha sido descubierto muy recientemente.

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Copyright information

© Centre for Tropical Veterinary Medicine 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. J. S. Harrison
    • 1
  • J. A. Hammond
    • 1
  • M. M. H. Sewell
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Tropical Veterinary Medicine, Easter BushUniversity of EdinburghRoslinScotland

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