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Wild (powerful) women: Restorying gender patterns

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Abstract

This paper addresses the use of the stories to help redefine gender expectations in relationships, creating a more active, powerful female voice. In particular, the popular bookWomen Who Run With the Wolves by Claudia Pinkola Estes is examined in context of other literature about women. Case examples demonstrating the application of such stories to marriage and family therapy are included.

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Knudson-Martin, C. Wild (powerful) women: Restorying gender patterns. Contemp Fam Ther 17, 93–107 (1995). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02249307

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Key words

  • power
  • women
  • gender
  • marriage
  • relationships