Psychopharmacology

, Volume 122, Issue 4, pp 386–389 | Cite as

A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, multi-center study of brofaromine in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder

  • D. G. Baker
  • B. I. Diamond
  • G. Gillette
  • M. Hamner
  • D. Katzelnick
  • T. Keller
  • T. A. Mellman
  • E. Pontius
  • M. Rosenthal
  • P. Tucker
  • B. A. vander Kolk
  • R. Katz
Original Investigation

Abstract

A large multi-center, double-blind, parallel trial to assess the efficacy of brofaromine in the treatment of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) failed to show a significant difference between the brofaromine and placebo treatment groups. The placebo response rate in this study was higher than that in previously published double-blind, placebo-controlled studies of PTSD.

Key words

Brofaromine MAOI PTSD Psychopharmacology 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. G. Baker
    • 1
  • B. I. Diamond
    • 2
  • G. Gillette
    • 3
  • M. Hamner
    • 4
  • D. Katzelnick
    • 5
  • T. Keller
    • 6
  • T. A. Mellman
    • 7
  • E. Pontius
    • 8
  • M. Rosenthal
    • 9
  • P. Tucker
    • 10
  • B. A. vander Kolk
    • 11
  • R. Katz
    • 12
  1. 1.VA Medical CenterCincinnatiUSA
  2. 2.VA Medical CenterAugustaUSA
  3. 3.VA Medical CenterLittle RockUSA
  4. 4.VA Medical CenterCharlestonUSA
  5. 5.Dean Foundation for Health, Research, and EductionMadisonUSA
  6. 6.VA Medical CenterSeattleUSA
  7. 7.VA Medical CenterMiamiUSA
  8. 8.VA Medical CenterPittsburghUSA
  9. 9.Behavioral Medicine ResourcesNew OrleansUSA
  10. 10.University of OklahomaOklahoma CityUSA
  11. 11.Eric Lindemann Mental Health CenterBrooklineUSA
  12. 12.Ciba-Geigy CorportationSummitUSA

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