Psychopharmacology

, Volume 106, Supplement 1, pp S56–S61

Antidepressants and cognition: comparative effects of moclobemide, viloxazine and maprotiline

  • H. Allain
  • A. Lieury
  • F. Brunet-Bourgin
  • C. Mirabaud
  • P. Trebon
  • F. Le Coz
  • J. M. Gandon
Section II Psychomotor Performance And Cognitive Performance

Abstract

The respective effects of three antidepressant drugs (moclobemide, 450 mg/j; viloxazine, 300 mg/j; maprotiline, 150 mg/j) on vigilance, attention, and memory were compared. Young depressed outpatients (n=46) entered a double-blind, randomised, monocentre clinical trial lasting for 6 weeks. Drug actions were assessed through the regular determination of critical flicker fusion point (CFF), reaction times (SRT), and a battery to measure memory components. None of the three drugs caused deterioration in cognitive functions. On the other hand, moclobemide improved both vigilance and attention (CFF, SRT) and some crucial components of memory (general memory scores, delayed word recall, recognition of familiar faces). This effect was rapid, stable, and superior to those of viloxazine and maprotiline. It may be explained by moclobemide's selective and reversible inhibition of monoamine oxidase A, as well as by the lack of any anticholinergic action.

Key words

Cognition Memory Depression Antidepressants Psychometry MAOI 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Allain
    • 1
  • A. Lieury
    • 2
  • F. Brunet-Bourgin
    • 3
  • C. Mirabaud
    • 4
  • P. Trebon
    • 3
  • F. Le Coz
    • 3
  • J. M. Gandon
    • 3
  1. 1.Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology LaboratoryFaculty of MedicineRennesFrance
  2. 2.Experimental Psychology LaboratoryUniversity of Haute BretagneRennesFrance
  3. 3.Technopole AtalanteRennesFrance
  4. 4.Roche ProductsNeuilly/Seine CedexFrance

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