Psychopharmacology

, Volume 116, Issue 2, pp 237–241 | Cite as

Effects of SR 48692, a selective non-peptide neurotensin receptor antagonist, on two dopamine-dependent behavioural responses in mice and rats

  • M. Poncelet
  • J. Souilhac
  • C. Gueudet
  • J. P. Terranova
  • D. Gully
  • G. Le Fur
  • P. Soubrié
Article

Abstract

One major mechanism underlying the central action of neurotensin is an interaction with the function of dopamine (DA)-containing neurons. In addition, direct or indirect DA agonists have been reported to promote neurotensin release. We have found that SR 48692, a non-peptide neurotensin receptor antagonist (0.04 – 0.64 mg/kg orally), antagonizes (50–65%) yawning induced by apomorphine (0.07 mg/kg SC) or bromocriptine (2 mg/kg IP) in rats, and turning behaviour induced by intrastriatal injection of apomorphine (0.25 µg), (+) SKF 38393 (0.1 µg), bromocriptine (0.01 ng) or (+) amphetamine (10 µg) in mice. Other apomorphine-induced effects in mice and rats such as climbing, hypothermia, hypo- and hyper-locomotion, penile erections and stereotypies were not significantly modified by SR 48692. Taken together, these data suggest that neurotensin may play a permissive role in the expression of some but not all behavioural responses to DA receptor stimulation.

Key words

SR 48692 Neurotensin receptor antagonist Dopamine Apomorphine Bromocriptine (+) SKF 38393 (+) Amphetamine Turning Yawning Mouse Rat 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Poncelet
    • 1
  • J. Souilhac
    • 1
  • C. Gueudet
    • 1
  • J. P. Terranova
    • 1
  • D. Gully
    • 1
  • G. Le Fur
    • 1
  • P. Soubrié
    • 1
  1. 1.Neuropsychiatry DepartmentSanofi RechercheMontpellier Cedex 04France

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