Psychopharmacology

, Volume 116, Issue 1, pp 120–122

m-Chlorophenylpiperazine decreases food intake in a test meal

  • A. E. S. Walsh
  • K. A. Smith
  • A. D. Oldman
  • C. Williams
  • E. M. Goodall
  • P. J. Cowen
Rapid Communications

Abstract

We studied the effect of the 5-HT receptor agonist,m-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP) (0.4 mg/kg), on food intake in 12 healthy female volunteers, in a double-blind placebo controlled design. Compared to placebo, mCPP significantly lowered food intake in a test meal. Treatment with mCPP also caused significant increases in ratings of nausea and light-headedness, though these effects had remitted by the time of the test meal. The results suggest that activation of brain 5-HT2C receptors may lower food intake in humans; it is also possible, however, that the hypophagic effect of mCPP in the present study could be a consequence of its adverse subjective side effects.

Key words

Food intake 5-HT receptors m-Chlorophenylpiperazine 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. E. S. Walsh
    • 1
  • K. A. Smith
    • 1
  • A. D. Oldman
    • 1
  • C. Williams
    • 1
  • E. M. Goodall
    • 1
  • P. J. Cowen
    • 1
  1. 1.Psychopharmacology Research UnitLittlemore HospitalOxfordUK

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