Psychopharmacology

, Volume 100, Issue 2, pp 165–167 | Cite as

Increased serotonin 5-HT2 receptor binding on blood platelets of suicidal men

  • Anat Biegon
  • Alexander Grinspoon
  • Batia Blumenfeld
  • Avraham Bleich
  • Alan Apter
  • Roberto Mester
Original Investigations

Abstract

In search of a physiological marker of depression and suicidal behavior, serotonin receptors of the 5-HT2 type were studied on platelet membranes from 19 control and 22 suicidal subjects. All were young, drug — and medication free men (18–21-years-old). 5-HT2 receptor binding was assayed using tritiated ketanserine at two concentrations. Receptor binding in the suicidal subjects was significantly higher than controls at both concentrations, the mean difference being around 50%. A similar difference between patients with major depressive disorder and matched controls has been observed previously. These findings support the use of 5-HT2 receptors on platelets as a research and diagnostic tool in depression and suicide.

Key words

Serotonin Suicide 5-HT2 receptors Platelets 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anat Biegon
    • 1
  • Alexander Grinspoon
    • 2
  • Batia Blumenfeld
    • 3
  • Avraham Bleich
    • 2
  • Alan Apter
    • 4
  • Roberto Mester
    • 3
  1. 1.The Weizmann Institute of ScienceRehovotIsrael
  2. 2.Mental Health DepartmentIsrael Defense ForceIsrael
  3. 3.Ness Ziona Mental Health CenterNess ZionaIsrael
  4. 4.Mental Health Department, IDF and Sackler School of MedicineTel Aviv UniversityIsrael

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