Advertisement

Psychopharmacology

, Volume 103, Issue 3, pp 339–342 | Cite as

Acute noise stress in rats increases the levels of diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI) in hippocampus and adrenal gland

  • C. Ferrarese
  • T. Mennini
  • N. Pecora
  • M. Gobbi
  • I. Appollonio
  • P. Bernasconi
  • M. Frigo
  • C. Regondi
  • C. Pierpaoli
  • L. Frattola
  • S. Garattini
Original Investigations

Abstract

We investigated the effect of acute noise-induced stress on the concentrations of diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI) and its processing products in brain regions and adrenal glands of rats. DBI levels in hippocampus began to increase at 15 and 30 min and became significantly higher (+100%) at 90 and 120 min after stress; they returned to normal values at 360 min. While basal DBI levels were similar in the left and right hippocampus, the stress-induced increase of DBI levels was significantly higher in the left compared to the right side. A significant increase was also detected in the adrenals; here, the time course of DBI increase paralleled that of previously reported plasma corticosterone in stressed rats, being significantly higher 30 min after stress, and recovering to normal values at 60 and 90 min. After acute noise-induced stress, no significant change of DBI levels was detectable in cerebral cortex, striatum, hypothalamus and cerebellum. The present study reports for the first time the occurrence of a modification of DBI and its processing products (ODN-like immunoreactivity) in an experimental model of stress, and suggests a role for these neuropeptides in emotional responses.

Key words

Stress Diazepam binding inhibitor Brain regions Adrenals 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Anholt PRH, Pedersen PL, De Souza EB, Snyder SH (1986) The peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor. Localization to the mitocondrial outer membrane. J Biol Chem 261:576–583Google Scholar
  2. Besman MJ, Yanagibashi K, Lee TD, Kawamura M, Hall PF, Shively JE (1989) Identification of des-(Gly-Ile)-endozepine as an effector of corticotropin-dependent adrenal steroidogenesis: stimulation of cholesterol delivery is mediated by the perypheral benzodiazepine receptor. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 86:4897–4901Google Scholar
  3. Biggio G, Corda MG, Concas A, Demontid G, Rossetti Z, Gessa GL (1981) Rapid changes in GABA binding induced by stress in different areas of the rat brain. Brain Res 229:363–369Google Scholar
  4. Bizzi A, Ricci MR, Veneroni E, Amato M, Garattini S (1984) Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists reverse the effect of diazepam on plasma corticosterone in stressed rats. J Pharm Pharmacol 36:134–135Google Scholar
  5. Bradford M (1976) A rapid and sensitive method for the quantitation of microgram quantities of protein utilizing the principle of protein-dye binding. Anal Biochem 72:248–254Google Scholar
  6. Costa E, Guidotti A (1979) Molecular mechanism in the receptor action of benzodiazepines. Ann, Rev Pharmacol Toxicol 19:531–545Google Scholar
  7. Drugan RC, Basile AS, Crawley JN, Paul SM, Skolnick P (1986) Inescapable shock reduces3H-RO 5-4864 binding to “peripheral-type” benzodiazepine receptors in the rat. Pharmacol Biochem Behav 24:1673–1677Google Scholar
  8. Ferrarese C, Alho H, Guidotti A, Costa E (1987a) Co-localization and co-release of GABA and putative allosteric modulators of GABA receptors. Neuropharmacology 26:1011–1018Google Scholar
  9. Ferrarese C, Vaccarino F, Alho H, Mellstrom B, Costa E, Guidotti A (1987b) Subcellular location and neuronal release of diazepam binding inhibitor. J Neurochem 48:1093–1102Google Scholar
  10. Ferrarese C, Appollonio I, Frigo M, Perego M, Pierpaoli C, Trabucchi M, Frattola L (1990a) Characterization of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors in human blood mononuclear cells. Neuropharmacology 29:375–378Google Scholar
  11. Ferrarese C, Appollonio I, Frigo M, Perego M, Piolti R, Trabucchi M, Frattola L (1990b) Decreased density of benzodiazepine receptors in lymphocytes of auxious patients: reversal after chronic diazepam treatment. Acta Psychiatr Scand 82:169–173Google Scholar
  12. Geschwind N, Galaburda AM (1985a) Cerebral lateralization. Biological mechanisms, associations and pathology: I A hypothesis and a program for research. Arch Neurol 42:428–459Google Scholar
  13. Geschwind N, Galaburda AM (1985b) Cerebral lateralization. Biological mechanisms, associations and pathology: II A hypothesis and a program for research. Arch Neurol 42:521–552Google Scholar
  14. Guidotti A, Forchetti CM, Corda MG, Konkel D, Bennet CD, Costa E (1983) Isolation, characterization and purification to homogeneity of an endogenous polypeptide with agonistic action on benzodiazepine receptors. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 80:3531–3533Google Scholar
  15. Guidotti A, Berkovich A, Ferrarese C, Santi MR, Costa E (1988) Nuronal-glial differential processing of DBI to yield ligands to central or peripheral benzodiazepine recognition sites. In: Sauvanet P, Lange SZ, Morselli PL (eds) Imidazopyridines in sleep disorders. Raven Press, New York, pp 25–38Google Scholar
  16. Haefely W, Pieri L, Polc P, Schaffner R (1981) General pharmacology and neuropharmacology of benzodiazepine derivatives. In: Hoffmeister F, Stille GM (eds) Handbook of experimental pharmacology. Psychotropic agents, vol 55 Part II. Springer Berlin Heidelberg New York pp 73–262Google Scholar
  17. Jung-Testas I, Hu ZH, Baulieu EE, Rabel P (1989) Neurosteroids: biosynthesis of pregnenolone and progesterone in primary cultures of rat glial cells. Endocrinology 125:2083–2091Google Scholar
  18. Lippa AS, Critchett D, Sano MC, Klepner CA, Greenblatt EN, Coupet J, Beer B (1979) Benzodiazepine receptors: cellular and behavioral characteristics. Pharmacol Biochem Behav 10:831Google Scholar
  19. Majewska MD, Harrison NL, Schwartz RD, Barker JL, Paul S (1986) Metabolites of steroid hormones are barbiturate like modulators of the GABA receptors. Science 232:1004–1006Google Scholar
  20. Marangos PJ, Patel J, Boulenger JP, Rosemberg CR (1982) Characterization of peripheral-type benzodiazepine binding sites in brain using3H-RO 5-4864. Mol Pharmacol 22:26–32Google Scholar
  21. Medina JH, Novas ML, Wolfman CNV, Levi de Stein M, De Robertis E (1983) Benzodiazepine receptors in rat cerebral cortex and hippocampus undergo rapid and reversible changes after acute stress. Neuroscience 9:331–335Google Scholar
  22. Mennini T, Gobbi M, Charuchinda C (1989) Noise-induced opposite changes in central and peripheral benzodiazepine receptors in rat brain cortex. Neurosci Res Commun 5:27–34Google Scholar
  23. Miyata M, Mocchetti I, Ferrarese C, Guidotti A, Costa E (1987) Protracted treatment with diazepam increases the turnover of putative endogenous ligands for the benzodiazepine/beta-carboline recognition site. Proc. Natl Acad Sci USA 84:1444–1448Google Scholar
  24. Mukhin AG, Papadopoulos V, Costa E, Krueger KE (199) Mithocondrial benzodiazepine receptors regulate steroid byosinthesis. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 86:9813–9816Google Scholar
  25. Novas ML, Medina JH, Calvo D, De Robertis E (1987) Increase of peripheral type benzodiazepine binding sites in kidney and olfactory bulb in acutely stressed rats. Eur J Pharmacol 135:243Google Scholar
  26. Papadopoulos V, Mukhin AG, Costa E, Krueger KE (1990) The peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor is functionally linked to Leydig cell steroidogenesis. J Biol Chem 265:3772–3779Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Ferrarese
    • 1
  • T. Mennini
    • 2
  • N. Pecora
    • 1
  • M. Gobbi
    • 2
  • I. Appollonio
    • 1
  • P. Bernasconi
    • 2
  • M. Frigo
    • 1
  • C. Regondi
    • 2
  • C. Pierpaoli
    • 1
  • L. Frattola
    • 1
  • S. Garattini
    • 2
  1. 1.Clinica NeurologicaUniversitá di Milano, Ospedale San GerardoMonzaItaly
  2. 2.Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche “Mario Negri”MilanoItaly

Personalised recommendations