Journal of Oceanography

, Volume 51, Issue 2, pp 257–259

RFLP analysis of a mitochondrial gene, cytochrome oxidase I (COI) of three species of the genusCalyptogena around Japan

  • Shigeaki Kojima
  • Takanori Kobayashi
  • Jun Hashimoto
  • Suguru Ohta
Short Contribution

Abstract

Phylogenetic relationship among three species of deep-sea vesicomyid bivalvesCalyptogena, i.e.,C. soyoae, C. solidissima, C. fausta and an undescribed species of the Iheya Ridge, Okinawa Trough was analyzed on the basis of the RFLP analysis of the fragment (about 1 kbp) of cytochrome oxidase I. Both the two populations ofC. soyoae (off Hatsushima and Okinoyama Bank, Sagami Bay) consisted of two haplotypes, which could be discriminated by only one restriction site (1.7% sequence divergence).Calyptogena of the Iheya Ridge could not be distinguished from one of the two haplotypes ofC. soyoae. Nucleotide substitution rates between species were calculated and dendrograms were constructed.

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Copyright information

© Oceanographic Society of Japan 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shigeaki Kojima
    • 1
  • Takanori Kobayashi
    • 2
  • Jun Hashimoto
    • 3
  • Suguru Ohta
    • 1
  1. 1.Ocean Research InstituteUniversity of TokyoTokyoJapan
  2. 2.National Institute of AquacultureNansei, MieJapan
  3. 3.Japan Marine Science and Technology CenterYokosuka, KanagawaJapan

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