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Journal of Child and Family Studies

, Volume 4, Issue 2, pp 193–206 | Cite as

Family and psychosocial predictors of obsessive compulsive disorder in a community sample of young adolescents

  • Laura A. Valleni-Basile
  • Carol Z. Garrison
  • Kirby L. Jackson
  • Jennifer L. Waller
  • Robert E. McKeown
  • Cheryl L. Addy
  • Steven P. Cuffe
Regular Papers

Abstract

A two-stage epidemiologic study conducted between 1986 and 1988 in the southeastern United States investigated family and psychosocial predictors of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and subclinical OCD in young adolescents. In the first stage, a life-event schedule and a family adaptability and cohesion scale were administered to a community sample of 3,283 adolescents. In stage two, the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia in School Age Children and the Children's Global Assessment Scale were administered to 488 mother-child pairs. In multivariable models family cohesion was the only significant correlate of OCD (odds ratio=0.95, 95% confidence interval 0.91–0.98). Gender, race, age, socioeconomic status, guardian status, adaptability, undesirable life events and desirable life events were not found to be significant predictors of OCD in models adjusting for cohesion. Note of the above variables were significantly associated with subclinical OCD. However, separate analyses of the 41 individual life events indicated seven specific events were significantly associated with OCD or subclinical OCD. These findings are at odds with the theory that overinvolvement of family members is a risk factor for OCD, though an association with overly rigid family structure cannot be eliminated based on these data. Further exploration of family characteristics is warranted.

Key Words

obsessive compulsive disorder community sample adolescent cohesion adaptability life events 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Laura A. Valleni-Basile
    • 1
  • Carol Z. Garrison
    • 2
  • Kirby L. Jackson
    • 1
  • Jennifer L. Waller
    • 1
  • Robert E. McKeown
    • 1
  • Cheryl L. Addy
    • 1
  • Steven P. Cuffe
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public HealthUniversity of South CarolinaColumbia
  2. 2.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Associate Provost and Dean of the Graduate SchoolUniversity of South CarolinaColumbia

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