Journal of Archaeological Research

, Volume 2, Issue 1, pp 113–136 | Cite as

The coming of age of the history of archaeology

  • Bruce G. Trigger

Abstract

Publications and organizational developments relating to the history of archaeology from 1989 until June 1993 are critically examined. Attention is paid to the changing motivations for producing such publications, their shifting intellectual orientation, controversies, especially as they relate to internal vs external approaches and the epistemological status of explanations, problems of verification, and the status of these studies as a subfield within archaeology.

Key words

archaeology history of archaeology history of science postmodernism 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bruce G. Trigger
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada

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