Advertisement

People with history: An update on historical archaeology in the United States

  • Barbara J. Little
Article

Abstract

Historical archaeology has expanded greatly in the past decade. This essay discusses some of the trends and themes that have become important in historical archaeology in the United States since 1982. The first section briefly assesses the field. The second discusses capitalism as one theme that may serve to unify research. Cross-cultural research, integrative analyses, and the concepts of power and ideology are central to this theme. The third section is a brief case study concerning the historic Cherokee. The conclusion comments on the institutional state of historical archaeology.

Key words

historical archaeology New World complex societies capitalism material culture studies historical material anthropology 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References cited

  1. Abercrombie, N., Hill, S., and Turner, B. S. (1980).The Dominant Ideology Thesis, George Allen & Unwin, London.Google Scholar
  2. Althusser, L. (1971).Lenin and Philosophy, Monthly Review Press, New York.Google Scholar
  3. Appadurai, A. (1986).The Social Life of Things, Commodities in Cultural Perspective. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.Google Scholar
  4. Baker, S. G. (1970). New Echota Archaeology 1969, a Progress Report. Submitted to Georgia Historical Commission.Google Scholar
  5. Barnett, S., and Silverman, M. G. (1979).Ideology and Everyday Life, Anthropology, Neomarxist Thought and the Problem of Ideology and the Social Whole. University of Michigan Press, Ann Arbor.Google Scholar
  6. Beaudry, M. C. (1984). Archaeology and the historic household.Man in the Northeast 28: 27–38.Google Scholar
  7. Beaudry, M. C. (ed.) (1988).Documentary Archaeology in the New World, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.Google Scholar
  8. Beaudry, M. C. (1989). The Lowell Boott Mills Complex and its housing: Material expressions of corporate ideology.Historical Archaeology 23(1): 19–33.Google Scholar
  9. Beaudry, M. C., and Mrozowski, S. (1988). The archaeology of work and home life in Lowell, Massachusetts: An interdisciplinary study of the Boott Cotton Mills Corporation.Industrial Archaeology 19(2): 1–22.Google Scholar
  10. Beaudry, M. C., and Mrozowski, S. (1989).Interdisciplinary Investigations of the Boott Mills Lowell, Massachusetts. Vol. III. The Boarding House System as a Way of Life. Cultural Resources Management Series 21, National Park Service, North Atlantic Regional Office, Boston.Google Scholar
  11. Beaudry, M., Cook, L. J., and Mrozowski, S. A. (1991). Artifacts and active voices: Material culture as social discourse. In McGuire, R. H., and Paynter, R. (eds.),The Archaeology of Inequality, Basil Blackwell, Oxford, pp, 150–191.Google Scholar
  12. Binford, L. R. (1977). Introduction. In Binford, L. R. (ed.),For Theory Building in Archaeology, Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  13. Binford, L. R. (1981).Bones: Ancient Men and Modern Myths, Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  14. Blakely, R. L. (ed.). (1988).The King Site: Continuity and Contact in Sixteenth-Century Georgia, University of Georgia Press, Athens.Google Scholar
  15. Blakey, M. L. (1983). Socio-political bias and ideological production in historical archaeology. In Gero, J. M., Lacy, D. M., and Blakey, M. L. (eds.),The Socio-Politics of Archaeology, Research Reports No. 23, Department of Anthropology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, pp. 5–16.Google Scholar
  16. Boone, J. L., Myers, J. E., and Redman, C. L. (1990). Archeological and historical approaches to complex societies.American Anthropologist 92: 630–646.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Bourdieu, P. (1984).Distinctions, a Social Critique of the Judgement of Taste (Nice, R., transl.), Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA.Google Scholar
  18. Brumfiel, E. M. (1992). Distinguished lecture in archeology: Breaking and entering the ecosystem—gender, class, and faction steal the show.American Anthropologist 94: 551–567.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Burley, D. V. (1989). Function, meaning and context: Ambiguities in ceramic use by the Hivernant Metis of the northwest plains.Historical Archaeology 23(1): 97–106.Google Scholar
  20. Cleland, C. E. (1988). Questions of substance, questions that count.Historical Archaeology 22(1): 13–17.Google Scholar
  21. Conkey, M. W., and J. M. Gero. (1991). Tensions, pluralities, and engendering archaeology: An introduction to women and prehistory. In Gero, J., and Conkey, M. W. (eds.),Engendering Archaeology, Women and Prehistory, Blackwell, Oxford, pp. 3–30.Google Scholar
  22. Costello, J. G., and Maniery, M. L. (1988). Rice Bowls in the Delta: Artifacts Recovered from the 1915 Asian Community of Walnut Grove, California,Occasional Paper 16, UCLA Institute of Archaeology, Los Angeles.Google Scholar
  23. Cotter, J. (ed.) (1984).The Scope of Historical Archaeology, Temple University Press, Philadelphia.Google Scholar
  24. Cotter, J. L., Roberts, D. G., and Parrington, M. (1992).The Buried Past, an Archaeological History of Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Press, Philadelphia.Google Scholar
  25. Craven, W. (1986).Colonial American Portraiture, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.Google Scholar
  26. DeBaillou, C. (1955). Excavations at New Echota in 1954.Early Georgia 1: 18–29.Google Scholar
  27. Deagan, K. (1982). Avenues of inquiry in historical archaeology. In Schiffer, M. B. (ed.),Advances in Archaeological Method and Theory, Vol. 5, Academic Press, New York, pp. 151–177.Google Scholar
  28. Deagan, K. (1983).Spanish St. Augustine, The Archaeology of a Colonial Creole Community, Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  29. Deagan, K. (1988). Neither history nor prehistory: The questions that count in historical archaeology.Historical Archaeology 22(1): 7–12.Google Scholar
  30. Deetz, J. (1963).Archaeological Investigations at La Purisima Mission, UCLA Archaeological Survey Annual Report 1962–1963, pp. 163–208.Google Scholar
  31. Deetz, J. (1977).In Small Things Forgotten: The Archaeology of Early American Life, Anchor Press/Doubleday, Garden City, NY.Google Scholar
  32. Deetz, J. (1983). Scientific humanism and humanistic science: A plea for paradigmatic pluralism in historical archaeology.Geoscience and Man 23: 27–34.Google Scholar
  33. Deetz, J. (1988a). History and archaeological theory: Walter Taylor revisited.American Antiquity 53: 13–22.Google Scholar
  34. Deetz, J. (1988b). American historical archaeology: Method and results.Science 239: 362–367.Google Scholar
  35. Dening, G. (1988).History's Anthropology, the Death of William Gooch, Special Publication of the Association for Social Anthropology in Oceania No. 2, University Press of America, Lanham, MD.Google Scholar
  36. Diamond, S. (1974).In Search of the Primitive, a Critique of Civilization, Transaction Books, New Brunswick, NJ.Google Scholar
  37. Dickens, R. (ed.) (1982).Archaeology of Urban America: The Search for Pattern and Process, Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  38. Dobyns, H. (1983).Their Number Become Thinned: Native American Population Dynamics in Eastern North America, University of Tennessee Press, Knoxville.Google Scholar
  39. Douglas, M., and Isherwood, B. (1979).The World of Goods, Basic Books, New York.Google Scholar
  40. Dyson, S. L. (ed.) (1985).Comparative Studies in the Archaeology of Colonialism, BAR International Series 233, Oxford.Google Scholar
  41. Eagleton, T. (1991).Ideology, an Introduction, Verso, New York.Google Scholar
  42. Earle, T., and Preucel, R. (1987). Processual Archaeology and the Radical Critique.Current Anthropology 28: 501–527.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Eisenstein, E. (1983).The Printing Revolution in Early Modern Europe, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.Google Scholar
  44. Epperson, T. W. (1990). Race and discipline of the plantation. In Orser, C. E. (ed.),Historical Archaeology on Southern Plantations and Farms, Historical Archaeology, Vol.24, No. 4, pp. 29–36.Google Scholar
  45. Ewen, C. R. (1991).From Spaniard to Creole, the Archaeology of Cultural Formation at Puerto Real, Haiti, University of Alabama Press, Tuscaloosa.Google Scholar
  46. Falk, L. (ed.) (1991).Historical Archaeology in Global Perspective, Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  47. Farnsworth, P. (1989). Native American acculturation in the Spanish Colonial Empire: The Franciscan missions of Alta California. In Champion, T. C. (ed.),Centre and Periphery, Comparative Studies in Archaeology, Unwin Hyman, London.Google Scholar
  48. Farnsworth, P., and Williams, J. S. (eds.) (1992). The archaeology of the Spanish Colonial and Mexican Republican periods.Historical Archaeology 26: No. 1.Google Scholar
  49. Faulkner, A., and Faulkner, G. (1987).The French at Pentagoet 1625–1674: An Archaeological Portrait of the Acadian Frontier, Maine Historic Preservation Commission, Augusta; New Brunswick Museum, St. Johns.Google Scholar
  50. Feierman, S. (1990).Peasant Intellectuals, Anthropology and History in Tanzania. University of Wisconsin Press, Madison.Google Scholar
  51. Felton, L., and Schulz, P. (1983).The Diaz Collection: Material Culture and Social Change in Mid-Nineteenth-Century Monterey, California Archaeological Reports No. 23, State of California Department of Parks and Recreation, Cultural Resource Unit, Sacramento.Google Scholar
  52. Ferguson, L. G. (1992).Uncommon Ground: Archaeology and Colonial African-America, Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  53. Fitzhugh, W. W. (ed.). (1985).Cultures in Contact: The Impact of European Contacts on Native American Cultural Institutions. A.D. 1000–1800, Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  54. Fitzhugh, W. W., and Olin, J. S. (eds.) (1993).Archaeology of the Frobisher Voyages, Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  55. Fowler, L. (1987).Shared Symbols, Contested Meanings, Gros Ventre Culture and History, 1778–1984, Cornell University Press, Ithaca, NY.Google Scholar
  56. Gathercole, P. (1984). A consideration of ideology. In Spriggs, M. (ed.),Marxist Perspectives in Archaeology, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp. 149–154.Google Scholar
  57. Gearing, F. (1962).Priests and Warriors: Social Structures for Cherokee Politics in the 18th Century, Memoir No. 93, American Anthropological Association, Menasha, WI.Google Scholar
  58. Geier, C., and Winter, S. (eds.) (1994).Look to the Earth: The Archaeology of the Civil War, University of Tennessee Press, Knoxville (in press).Google Scholar
  59. Geismar, J. H. (1982).The Archaeology of Social Disintegration in Skunk Hollow, Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  60. Gibbon, G. (1989).Explanation in Archaeology, Basil Blackwell, Oxford.Google Scholar
  61. Glassie, H. (1975).Folk Housing in Middle Virginia, University of Tennessee Press, Knoxville.Google Scholar
  62. Gould, R. A., and Schiffer, M. B. (eds.) (1981).Modern Material Culture: The Archaeology of Us, Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  63. Greenwood, J. (1985).The Industrial Archaeology and Industrial History of Northern England, a Bibliography, Open University, Cranfield.Google Scholar
  64. Gums, B. L. (1988).Archaeology at French Colonial Cahokia, Studies in Illinois Archaeology No. 3, Illinois Historic Preservation Agency, Springfield.Google Scholar
  65. Hall, M. (1992). Small things and the mobile, conflictual fusion of power, fear, and desire. In Yentsch, A. E., and Beaudry, M. C. (eds.),Art and Mystery of Historical Archaeology: Essays in Honor of James Deetz, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, pp. 373–399.Google Scholar
  66. Handsman, R. G. (1977).The Bushkill Complex as an Anomaly: Unmasking the Ideology of American Archaeology, Ph.D. dissertation, Department of Anthropology, American University, Washington, DC, University Microfilms, Ann Arbor, MI.Google Scholar
  67. Handsman, R. G. (1983). Historical archaeology and capitalism, subscriptions and separations: The production of individualism.North American Archaeologist 4(1): 63–79.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  68. Hantman, J. (1990). Between Powhatan and Quirank: Reconstructing Monacan culture and history in the context of Jamestown.American Anthropologist 92: 676–690.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  69. Hardesty, D. L. (1985). Evolution on the industrial frontier. In Green, S. W., and Perlman, S. M. (eds.),The Archaeology of Frontiers and Boundaries, Academic Press, Orlando, FL, pp. 213–230.Google Scholar
  70. Hardesty, D. L. (1988).The Archaeology of Mining and Miners: A View from the Silver State, Special Publication No. 6, Society for Historical Archaeology, California, Pennsylvania.Google Scholar
  71. Herman, B. L. (1984). Multiple materials, multiple meanings: The fortunes of Thomas Mendenhall.Winterthur Portfolio 19(1): 67–86.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  72. Hodder, I. (1979). Economic and social stress and material culture patterning.American Antiquity:44: 446–454.Google Scholar
  73. Hodder, I. (ed.) (1982a).Symbolic and Structural Archaeology, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.Google Scholar
  74. Hodder, I. (1982b).Symbols in Action, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.Google Scholar
  75. Hodder, I. (1985). Postprocessual archaeology. In Schiffer, M. B. (ed.),Advances in Archaeological Methods and Theory, Vol. 8, Academic Press, New York, pp. 1–26.Google Scholar
  76. Hodder, I. (1986).Reading the Past, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.Google Scholar
  77. Hodder, I. (ed.) (1989).The Meaning of Things, Material Culture and Symbolic Expressions, Unwin Hyman, London.Google Scholar
  78. Hodder, I. (1991). Interpretive archaeology and its role.American Antiquity 56: 7–18.Google Scholar
  79. Honerkamp, N. (1988). Preface. Questions that count in historical archaeology.Historical Archaeology 22(1): 5–6.Google Scholar
  80. Hoover, R. L., and Costello, J. G. (eds.). (1985).Excavations at Mission San Antonio, 1976–1978, UCLA Institute of Archaeology No. 26, Los Angeles.Google Scholar
  81. Howson, J. E. (1990). Social relations and material culture: A critique of the archaeology of plantation slavery. In Orser, C. E., Jr. (ed.),Historical Archaeology on Southern Plantations and Farms, Historical Archaeology, Vol.24, No. 4, pp. 78–91.Google Scholar
  82. Hudson, K. (1979).World Industrial Archaeology, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.Google Scholar
  83. Ingersoll, D. W., Jr., and Bronitsky, G. (eds.) (1987).Mirror and Metaphor: Material and Social Constructions of Reality, University Press of America, Lanham, MD.Google Scholar
  84. Isaac, R. (1982).The Transformation of Virginia 1740–1790. University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill.Google Scholar
  85. Johnson, M. H. (1989). Conceptions of agency in archaeological interpretation.Journal of Anthropological Archaeology 8: 189–211.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  86. Keegan, W. F. (1992).The People Who Discovered Columbus, University Press of Florida, Gainesville.Google Scholar
  87. Kelso, W. M. (1984).Kingsmill Plantations 1619–1800: Archaeology of Country Life in Colonial Virginia, Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  88. Kelso, W., and Most, R. (eds.) (1990).Earth Patterns: Essays in Landscape Archaeology, University Press of Virginia, Charlottesville.Google Scholar
  89. King, D. (ed.) (1979).The Cherokee Indian Nation, University of Tennessee Press, Knoxville.Google Scholar
  90. Kryder-Reid, E. (1994). “As the Gardener, so is the garden”: The archaeology of landscape as myth. In Shackel, P. A., and Little, B. J. (eds.),The Historical Archaeology of the Chesapeake, Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  91. Lears, T. J. J. (1981).No Place of Grace. Antimodernism and the Transformation of American Culture 1880–1920. Pantheon Books, New York.Google Scholar
  92. Leary, T. E. (1979). Industrial archaeology and industrial ecology.Radical History Review 21: 171–182.Google Scholar
  93. Leone, M. P. (1977). Foreword. In South, S. (ed.),Research Strategies in Historical Archaeology, Academic Press, New York, pp. xvii-xxi.Google Scholar
  94. Leone, M. P. (1982). Some opinions about recovering mind.American Antiquity 47: 742–760.Google Scholar
  95. Leone, M. P. (1984). Interpreting ideology in historical archaeology: Using the rules of perspective in the William Paca Garden in Annapolis, Maryland. In Miller, D., and Tilley, C. (eds.),Ideology, Power, and Prehistory, Cambridge University Press, London, pp. 25–36.Google Scholar
  96. Leone, M. P. (1988). The relationship between archaeological data and the documentary record: 18th-century gardens in Annapolis, Maryland.Historical Archaeology 22(1): 29–35.Google Scholar
  97. Leone, M. P., and Potter, P. B., Jr. (eds.) (1988a).The Recovery of Meaning in Historical Archaeology in the Eastern United States, Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  98. Leone, M. P., and Potter, P. B., Jr. (1988b). Introduction: Issues in historical archaeology. In Leone, M. P., and Potter, P. B., Jr. (eds.),The Recovery of Meaning in Historical Archaeology in the Eastern United States, Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC, pp. 1–22.Google Scholar
  99. Leone, M. P., and Shackel, P. A. (1987). Forks, clocks, and power. In Ingersoll, D. (ed.),Mirror and Metaphor: Material and Social Constructions of Reality, University Press of America, Lanham, MD, pp. 45–62.Google Scholar
  100. Leone, M. P., Potter, P. B., Jr., and Shackel, P. A. (1987). Toward a critical archaeology.Current Anthropology 28: 283–302.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  101. Leone, M. P., Little, B. J., Warner, M. S., Potter, P. B., Jr., Shackel, P. A., Logan, G. C., Mullins, P. R., and Ernstein, J. A. (1994). The constituencies for an archaeology of African Americans in Annapolis, Maryland. In Singleton, T. (ed.), “I Too Am America”: Studies in African American Archaeology, University Press of Virginia, Charlottesville (in press).Google Scholar
  102. Lewis, K. (1984).The American Frontier: An Archaeological Study of Settlement Pattern and Process, Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  103. Little, B. J. (1988). Craft and culture change in the eighteenth-century Chesapeake. In Leone, M. P., and Potter, P. B., Jr. (eds.),The Recovery of Meaning, Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC, pp. 263–292.Google Scholar
  104. Little, B. (1992a). Text-Aided Archaeology. In Little, B. J. (ed.),Text-Aided Archaeology, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, pp. 1–6.Google Scholar
  105. Little, B. J. (ed.) (1992b).Text-Aided Archaeology, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL.Google Scholar
  106. Little, B. J., and Shackel, P. A. (1989). Scales of historial anthropology: An archaeology of colonial Anglo-America.Antiquity 63: 495–509.Google Scholar
  107. Little, B. J., and Shackel, P. A. (eds.) (1992).Meanings and uses of material culture. Historical Archaeology 26: No. 3.Google Scholar
  108. Lubar, S., and Kingery, W. D. (eds.) (1993).History from Things, Essays on Material Culture, Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  109. McCracken, G. (1988).Culture and Consumption, New Approaches to the Symbolic Character of Consumer Goods and Activities, Indiana University Press, Bloomington.Google Scholar
  110. McDaniel, J. M., and Russ, K. C. (eds.) (1984).Historical Archaeology West of the Blue Ridge: A Regional Example from Rockbridge County. The James G. Leyburn Papers in Anthropology, Vol. 1, Liberty Hall Press, Washington and Lee University, Lexington, VA.Google Scholar
  111. McDonald, J. D., Zimmerman, L. J., McDonald, A. L., Tall Bull, W., and Rising Sun, T. (1991). The northern Cheyenne outbreak of 1879: Using oral history and archaeology as tools of resistance. In McGuire, R. H., and Paynter, R. (eds.),The Archaeology of Inequality, Basil Blackwell, Oxford, pp. 64–78.Google Scholar
  112. McGhee, R. (1984). Contact between native North Americans and the medieval Norse: A review of the Evidence.American Antiquity 49: 4–26.Google Scholar
  113. McGinty, J. R. (1955). Symbols of a civilization that perished in its infancy.Early Georgia 1(4): 14–17.Google Scholar
  114. McGuire, R. H. (1982). The study of ethnicity in historical archaeology.Journal of Anthropological Archeology 1: 159–178.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  115. McGuire, R. H. (1988). Dialogues with the dead: Ideology and the cemetery. In Leone, M. P., and Potter, P. B., Jr. (eds.),The Recovery of Meaning: Historical Archaeology in the Eastern United States, Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC, pp. 435–480.Google Scholar
  116. McGuire, R. H. (1991). Building power in the cultural landscape of Broome County, New York, 1880 to 1940. In McGuire, R. H., and Paynter, R. (eds.),The Archaeology of Inequality, Basil Blackwell, Oxford, pp. 102–124.Google Scholar
  117. McGuire, R. H., and Paynter, R. (eds.) (1991).The Archaeology of Inequality, Basil Blackwell, Oxford.Google Scholar
  118. McKee, L., Hood, V. P., and Macpherson, S. (1992). Reinterpreting the construction history of the service area of the Hermitage Mansion. In Little, B. J. (ed.),Text-Aided Archaeology, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, pp. 163–180.Google Scholar
  119. McKendrick, N., Brewer, J., and Plumb, J. H. (1982).The Birth of a Consumer Society: The Commercialization of the Eighteenth Century, Indiana University Press, Bloomington.Google Scholar
  120. McLoughlin, W. G. (1984).Cherokees and Missionaries 1789–1839, Yale University Press, New Haven.Google Scholar
  121. McLoughlin, W. G. (1986).Cherokee Renascence in the New Republic, Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ.Google Scholar
  122. Meltzer, D. J. (1981). Ideology and material culture. In Gould, R. A., and Schiffer, M. B. (eds.),Modern Material Culture, the Archaeology of Us, Academic Press, New York, pp. 113–125.Google Scholar
  123. Miller, D., and Tilley, C. (1984). Ideology, power, and prehistory: An introduction. In Miller, D., and Tilley, C. (eds.),Ideology, Power, and Prehistory, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp. 1–15.Google Scholar
  124. Miller, G. (1980). Classification and economic scaling of 19th-century ceramics.Historical Archaeology 14: 1–41.Google Scholar
  125. Miller, G. (1991). A revised set of CC index values for classification and economic scaling of English ceramics from 1787 to 1880.Historical Archaeology 25(1): 1–25.Google Scholar
  126. Miller, H. (1986).Discovering Maryland's First City: A Summary Report on the 1981–1984 Archaeological Investigations in St. Mary's City Maryland. St. Mary's City Archaeology Series No. 2, St. Mary's City, MD.Google Scholar
  127. Mooney, J. (1900).Myths of the Cherokee. Bureau of American Ethnography, 19th Annual Report, 1897–1898, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  128. Mooney, J. (1975).Historical Sketch of the Cherokee, Aldine, Chicago.Google Scholar
  129. Mrozowski, S. L. (1988). Historical archaeology as anthropology.Historical Archaeology 22(1): 18–24.Google Scholar
  130. Neiman, F. D. (1978). Domestic architecture at the Clifts Plantation: The social context of early Virginia building.Northern Neck of Virginia Historical Magazine 28: 3096–3128. Reprinted in Upton, D., and Vlach, J. M. (eds.) (1986).Common Places: Readings in American Vernacular Architecture, University of Georgia Press, Athens, pp. 292–314.Google Scholar
  131. Neuman, R. W. (ed.) (1983). Historical archaeology of the eastern United States: Papers from the R. J. Russell Symposium.Geoscience and Man 26.Google Scholar
  132. Noël Hume, I. (1983).Martin's Hundred, Alfred A. Knopf, New York.Google Scholar
  133. Noël Hume, I. (1964). Archaeology: Handmaiden to history.The North Carolina Historical Review 41(2): 215–225.Google Scholar
  134. Orser, C. (1988a).The Material Basis of the Postbellum Tenant Plantation: Historical Archaeology in the South Carolina Piedmont, University of Georgia Press, Athens.Google Scholar
  135. Orser, C. (1988). Toward a theory of power for historical archaeology: Plantation and space. In Leone, M. P., and Potter, P. B., Jr. (eds.),The Recovery of Meaning: Historical Archaeology in the Eastern United States, Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC, pp. 313–343.Google Scholar
  136. Orser, C. (1989). On plantations and patterns.Historical Archaeology 23(2): 28–40.Google Scholar
  137. Orser, C. (1990a). Archaeological approaches to New World plantation slavery. In Schiffer, M. B. (ed.),Archaeological Method and Theory, Vol. 2, University of Arizona Press, Tucson, pp. 111–154.Google Scholar
  138. Orser, C. (ed.) (1990b).Historical archaeology on southern plantations and farms.Historical Archaeology 24: No. 4.Google Scholar
  139. Otto, J. S. (1984).Cannon's Point plantation 1794–1860: Living conditions and status patterns in the Old South, Academic Press, Orlando, FL.Google Scholar
  140. Pastron, A. G., and Hattori, E. M. (eds.) (1990).The Hoff Store Site and Gold Rush Merchandise from San Francisco, California, Special Publication No. 7, Society for Historical Archaeology, California, Pennsylvania.Google Scholar
  141. Patterson, T. C. (1999a). History and the post-processual archaeologies.Man 24: 555–566.Google Scholar
  142. Patterson, T. C. (1990b). Some theoretical tensions within and between the processual and postprocessual archaeologies.Journal of Anthropological Archaeology 9: 189–200.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  143. Paynter, R. (1982).Models of Spatial Inequality: Settlement Patterns in Historical Archaeology, Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  144. Paynter, R. (1985). Surplus Flow between Frontiers and Homelands. In Green, S. W. and Perlman, S. M. (eds.),The Archaeology of Frontiers and Boundaries, Academic Press, Orlando, FL. pp. 163–211.Google Scholar
  145. Paynter, R. (1988). Steps to an archaeology of capitalism. In Leone, M. P., and Potter, P. B., Jr. (eds.),The Recovery of Meaning: Historical Archaeology in the Eastern United States, Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC, pp. 407–433.Google Scholar
  146. Paynter, R. (1989). The archaeology of equality and inequality.Annual Review of Anthropology 18: 369–399.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  147. Paynter, R., and McGuire, R. H. (1991). The archaeology of inequality: Material culture, domination and resistance. In McGuire, R. H., and Paynter, R. (eds.),The Archaeology of Inequality, Basil Blackwell, Oxford, pp. 1–27.Google Scholar
  148. Perdue, T. (1979).Slavery and the Evolution of Cherokee Society 1540–1866. University of Tennessee Press, Knoxville.Google Scholar
  149. Perdue, T. (ed.) (1983).Cherokee Editor, the Writings of Elias Boudinot, University of Tennessee Press, Knoxville.Google Scholar
  150. Perdue, T. (1989).The Cherokee, Chelsea House, New York.Google Scholar
  151. Persico, V. R., Jr. (1979). Early nineteenth-century Cherokee political organization. In King, D. H. (ed.),The Cherokee Indian Nation, University of Tennessee Press, Knoxville., pp. 92–109.Google Scholar
  152. Pillsbury, R. (1983). The Europeanization of the Cherokee settlement landscape prior to removal: A Georgia case study.Geoscience and Man 23: 59–69.Google Scholar
  153. Posnansky, M., and Decorse, C. R. (1986). Historical archaeology in sub-Saharan Africa — A review.Historical Archaeology 20(1): 1–14.Google Scholar
  154. Potter, P. B., Jr. (1992). Middle-range theory, ceramics, and capitalism in 19th-century Rockbridge County, Virginia. In Little, B. J. (ed.),Text-Aided Archaeology, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, pp. 9–24.Google Scholar
  155. Potter, S. R. (1993).Commoners, Tribute, and Chiefs; the Development of Algonquian Culture in the Potomac Valley, University Press of Virginia, Charlottesville.Google Scholar
  156. Preucel, R. W. (ed.) (1991).Processual and Postprocessual Archaeologies; Multiple Ways of Knowling the Past, Occasional Paper No. 10, Center for Archaeological Investigations, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale.Google Scholar
  157. Ramenofsky, A. (1987).Vectors of Death: The Archaeology of European Contact, University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque.Google Scholar
  158. Rapp, W. F., and Beranek, S. K. (1984).The Industrial Archaeology of Nebraska, J-B, Crete, NE.Google Scholar
  159. Rathje, W. L. (1979). Modern material culture studies. In Schiffer, M. B. (ed.),Advances in Archaeological Method and Theory, Vol. 2, Academic Press, New York, pp. 1–29.Google Scholar
  160. Redman, C. L. (1986).Qsar es-Seghir, An Archaeological View of Medieval Life, Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  161. Reitz, E. J., and Scarry, M. (1985).Reconstructing Historic Subsistence with an Example from Sixteenth-Century Spanish Florida, Special Publication, No. 3, Society for Historical Archaeology, California, PA.Google Scholar
  162. Reynolds, B., and Stott, M. A. (eds.) (1987).Material Anthropology, Contemporary Approaches to Material Culture, University Press of America, Lanham, MD.Google Scholar
  163. Rogers, J. D. (1990).Objects of Change: The Archaeology and History of Arikara Contact with Europeans, Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  164. Rogers, J. D., and Wilson, S. M. (1993).Ethnohistory and Archaeology, Approaches to Postcontact Change in the Americas, Plenum, New York.Google Scholar
  165. Ronda, J. P., and Axtell, J. (1978).Indian Missions, a Critical Bibliography, Indiana University Press, Bloomington.Google Scholar
  166. Rothschild, N. A. (1990).New York City Neighborhoods, the 18th Century, Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  167. Sahlins, M. (1981).Historical Metaphors and Mythical Realities, Special Publication of the Association for Social Anthropology in Oceania No. 1, University of Michigan Press, Ann Arbor.Google Scholar
  168. Sahlins, M. (1985).Islands of History, University of Chicago Press, Chicago.Google Scholar
  169. Sande, T. A. (1976).Industrial Archaeology: A New Look at the American Heritage, S. Greene Press, Brattleboro, VT.Google Scholar
  170. Schama, S. (1987).The Embarrassment of Riches: An Interpretation of Dutch Culture in the Golden Age, Alfred Knopf, New York.Google Scholar
  171. Schiffer, M. B. (1976).Behavioral Archaeology, Academic Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  172. Schiffer, M. B. (1988). The structure of archaeological theory.American Antiquity 53: 461–485.Google Scholar
  173. Schiffer, M. B. (1991).The Portable Radio in American life, University of Arizona Press, Tucson.Google Scholar
  174. Schlereth, T. J. (ed.) (1985).Material Culture, a Research Guide, University Press of Kansas, Lawrence.Google Scholar
  175. Schmidt, P. (1977).Historical Archaeology: A Structural Approach in African Culture, Greenwood Press, Westport, CT.Google Scholar
  176. Schrire, C., and Merwick, D. (1991). Dutch-indigenous relations in New Netherland and the Cape in the seventeenth century. In Falk, L. (ed.),Historical Archaeology in Global Perspective, Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC, pp. 11–20.Google Scholar
  177. Schuyler, R. L. (1970). Historical and historic sites archaeology as anthropology: Basic definitions and relationships.Historical Archaeology 4: 83–89.Google Scholar
  178. Schuyler, R. L. (1976). Images of America: The contribution of historical archaeology to national identity.Southwestern Lore 42(4): 27–39.Google Scholar
  179. Schuyler, R. L. (ed.) (1982).Urban Archaeology in America.North American Archaeologist 3(3), Baywood, Farmingdale, NY.Google Scholar
  180. Schuyler, R. L. (1988). Archaeological remains, documents, and anthropology: A call for a new culture history.Historical Archaeology 22(1): 36–42.Google Scholar
  181. Scott, D. D., and Fox, R. A., Jr. (1987).Archaeological Insights into the Custer Battle, an Assessment of the 1984 Field Season, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman.Google Scholar
  182. Scott, D. D., Fox, R. A., Jr., Conner, M. A., and Harmon, D. (1989).Archaeological Perspectives on the Battle of the Little Bighorn, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman.Google Scholar
  183. Scott, J. C. (1985).Weapons of the Weak, the Everyday Forms of Peasant Resistance, Yale University Press, New Haven, CT.Google Scholar
  184. Scott, P. E., and Deetz, J. (1990). Building, furnishings and social change in early Victorian Grahamstown.Social Dynamics 16(1): 76–89.Google Scholar
  185. Seifert, D. J. (ed.) (1991). Gender in historical archaeology.Historical Archaeology 25: No. 4.Google Scholar
  186. Self, R. D. (1955). Chronology of New Echota.Early Georgia 1(4): 3–5.Google Scholar
  187. Shackel, P. A. (1993a).A Historical Archaeology of Personal Discipline and Material Culture in the Chesapeake, University of Tennessee Press, Knoxville.Google Scholar
  188. Shackel, P. A. (ed.) (1993b).Interdisciplinary Investigations of Domestic Life in Government Block B: Perspectives on Harpers Ferry's Armory and Commercial District, National Park Service, National Capital Region, Occasional Report No. 6.Google Scholar
  189. Shackel, P. A., and Little, B. J. (1992). Post-processual approaches to meanings and uses of material culture in historical archaeology. In Little, B. J., and Shackel, P. A. (eds.),Meanings and Uses of Material Culture, Historical Archaeology, Vol.26, No. 3, pp. 5–11.Google Scholar
  190. Shackel, P. A., and Little, B. J. (eds.) (1994).The Historical Archaeology of the Chesapeake, Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  191. Shanks, M., and Tilley, C. (1987).Re-Constructing Archaeology Theory and Practice, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.Google Scholar
  192. Sichone, O. B. (1989). The development of an urban working-class culture on the Rhodesian Copperbelt. In Miller, D., Rowlands, M., and Tilley, C. (eds.),Domination and Resistance, Unwin Hyman, London, pp. 290–298.Google Scholar
  193. Sider, G. M. (1976). Lumbee Indian cultural nationalism and ethnogenesis.Dialectical Anthropology 1: 161–172.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  194. Singleton, T. (ed.) (1985).The Archaeology of Slavery and Plantation Life, Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  195. Singleton, T. (1994).“I Too Am America”: Studies in African American Archaeology, University of Virginia Press, Charlottesville (in press).Google Scholar
  196. Smith, M. T. (1987).Archaeology of Aboriginal Culture Change in the Interior Southeast: Depopulation During the Early Historic Period, University Presses of Florida, Gainesville.Google Scholar
  197. Smith, S. D. (1976).An Archaeological and Historical Assessment of the First Hermitage, Research Series No. 2, Tennessee Department of Conservation, Division of Archaeology.Google Scholar
  198. South, S. (1977a).Method and Theory in Historical Archaeology, Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  199. South, S. (ed.) (1977b).Research Strategies in Historical Archeology, Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  200. South, S. (1988a). Santa Elena: Threshold of Conquest. In Leone, M. P., and Potter, P. B., Jr. (eds.),The Recovery of Meaning: Historical Archaeology in the Eastern United States, Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC, pp. 27–72.Google Scholar
  201. South, S. (1988b). Whither pattern?Historical Archaeology 22(1): 25–28.Google Scholar
  202. Spencer-Wood, S. (ed.) (1987).Consumer Choice in Historical Archaeology, Plenum Press, New York.Google Scholar
  203. Spencer-Wood, S. (1991). Toward an historical archaeology of materialist domestic reform. In McGuire, R. H., and Paynter, R. (eds.),The Archaeology of Inequality, Basil Blackwell, Oxford, pp. 231–286.Google Scholar
  204. Staski, E. (ed.) (1987).Living in Cities: Current Research in Urban Archaeology, Special Publication No. 5, Society for Historical Archaeology, California, Pennsylvania.Google Scholar
  205. Staski, E. (1990). Studies of ethnicity in North American historical archaeology.North American Archaeologist 11(2): 121–145.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  206. Stevenson, M. G. (1982). Toward and understanding of site abandonment behavior: Evidence from historic mining camps in the southwest Yukon.Journal of Anthropological Archaeology 1: 236–265.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  207. St. George, R. B. (ed.) (1988).Material Life in America, 1600–1860, Northeastern University Press, Boston.Google Scholar
  208. Stilgoe, J. R. (1982).Common Landscapes of America, 1580 to 1845, Yale University Press, New Haven, CT.Google Scholar
  209. Stone, G., and Ottusch-Kianka, D. (eds.) (1987).The Historical Archaeology of Long Island, Vol. VII, Part I. The Sites, Suffolk County Archaeological Association and Nassau County Archaeological Committee, Stony Brook, NY.Google Scholar
  210. Thomas, D. H. (ed.) (1989).Columbian Consequences, Vol. 1. Archaeological and Historical Perspectives on the Spanish Borderlands West, Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  211. Thomas, D. H. (ed.) (1990).Columbian Consequences, Vol. 2. Archaeological and Historical Perspectives on the Spanish Borderlands East, Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  212. Thomas, D. H. (ed.) (1991).Columbian Consequences, Vol. 3. The Spanish Borderlands in Pan-American Perspective, Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  213. Tilley, C. (ed.) (1990).Reading Material Culture, Basil Blackwell, Oxford.Google Scholar
  214. Trigger, B. G. (1985).Natives and Newcomers, Canada's “Heroic Age” Reconsidered, McGill-Queen's University Press, Montreal.Google Scholar
  215. Upton, D. (1986).Holy Things and Profane: Anglican Parish Churches in Colonial Virginia, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA.Google Scholar
  216. Upton, D., and Vlach, J. M. (eds.) (1986).Common Places, Readings in American Vernacular Architecture, University of Georgia Press, Athens.Google Scholar
  217. Vance, M. (1984).Monographs on Industrial Archaeology, Bibliography A1286, Vance Bibliographies, Architecture Series, Monticello, IL.Google Scholar
  218. Verano, J. W., and Ubelaker, D. H. (eds.) (1992).Disease and Demography in the Americas, Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  219. Walde, D., and Willows, N. D. (eds.) (1991).The Archaeology of Gender, Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Chacmool Conference, Archaeological Association of the University of Calgary, Calgary.Google Scholar
  220. Wallace, A. F. C. (1970).Culture and Personality, Random House, New York.Google Scholar
  221. Walthall, J. A. (ed.) (1990).French Colonial Archaeology of the Illinois Country, University of Illinois Press, Urbana.Google Scholar
  222. Walthall, J. A., and Emerson, T. E. (eds.) (1992).Calumet and Fleur-de-Lys; Archaeology of the Indian and French Contact in the Midcontinent, Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  223. Ward, A. E. (ed.) (1983).Forgotten Places and Things, Archaeological Perspectives on American History, Center for Anthropological Studies, Albuquerque, NM.Google Scholar
  224. Watson, P. J., and Fotiadis, M. (1990). The razor's edge: Symbolic-structuralist archeology and the expansion of archeological inference.American Anthropologist 92: 613–629.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  225. Watson, R. A. (1990). Ozymandias, King of Kings: Postprocessual radical archaeology as critique.American Antiquity 55: 673–689.Google Scholar
  226. Wegars, P. (ed.) (1993).Hidden Heritage, Historical Archaeology of the Overseas Chinese, Baywood, Amityville, NY.Google Scholar
  227. Wilms, D. (1974).Cherokee Indian Land Use in Georgia 1800–1888. Ph.D. dissertation. University of Georgia, Athens.Google Scholar
  228. Wilson, J. H., Jr. (ed.) (1985).Current Research in the Historical Archaeology of the Carolinas, Chicora Foundation Research Series No. 4, Columbia, SC.Google Scholar
  229. Winer, M., and Deetz, J. (1990). The transformation of British culture in the eastern Cape, 1820–1860.Social Dynamics 16(1): 55–75.Google Scholar
  230. Wobst, H. M. (1977). Stylistic behavior and information exchange. In Cleland, C. E. (ed.),For the Director: Research Essays in Honor of James B. Griffin, Museum of Anthropology Publication 61, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.Google Scholar
  231. Wolf, E. (1982).Europe and the People Without History, University of California Press, Berkeley.Google Scholar
  232. Wolf, E. (1990). Distinguished Lecture: Facing power — Old insights, new questions.American Anthropologist 92: 586–596.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  233. Wood, P., Waselkov, G. A., and Hantley, T. (eds.) (1989).Powhatan's Mantle: Indians in the Colonial Southeast, University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln.Google Scholar
  234. Yentsch, A. (ed.) (1987).Humanism and revisionism in historical archaeology.American Archaeology 6: No. 1.Google Scholar
  235. Yentsch, A. (1991a). Engendering visible and invisible ceramic artifacts, especially dairy vessels.Historical Archaeology 25(4): 132–155.Google Scholar
  236. Yentsch, A. (1991b). The symbolic divisions of pottery: Sex-related attributes of English and Anglo-American household pots. In McGuire, R. H., and Paynter, R. (eds.),The Archaeology of Inequality, Basil Blackwell, Oxford, pp. 192–230.Google Scholar
  237. Yentsch, A. E., and Beaudry, M. C. (eds.) (1992).Art and Mystery of Historical Archaeology: Essays in Honor of James Deetz, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL.Google Scholar
  238. Young, B. K. (1992). Text aided or text misled? Reflections on the uses of archaeology in medieval history. In Little, B. J. (ed.),Text-Aided Archaeology, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, pp. 135–150.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barbara J. Little
    • 1
  1. 1.National Park Service, National Capital RegionWashington, DC

Personalised recommendations