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Clinical cutoffs for the beck Depression inventory and the Geriatric Depression scale with older adult psychiatric outpatients

  • Evan S. Kogan
  • Robert I. Kabacoff
  • Michel Hersen
  • Vincent B. Van Hasselt
Article

Abstract

The present study developed new clinical cutoffs for the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) with 59 older adult psychiatric outpatients. Maximum discrimination of a current major depressive episode resulted, with cutoff scores of 22 for the BDI and 16 for the GDS. Specifically, the following validity scores emerged for the BDI: sensitivity, 64%; specificity, 73%; positive predictive power, 75%; negative predictive power, 61%; and hit rate 68%. For the GDS the validity scores were as follows: sensitivity, 79%; specificity, 69%; positive predictive power, 77%; negative predictive power, 72%; and hit rate, 75%. Combined BDI and GDS scores did not result in improved prediction of a current major depressive episode as compared to the GDS alone. These results support the notion that the BDI and GDS are valid quick screening instruments in discriminating a current major depressive episode for older adult psychiatric outpatients.

Key words

Beck Depression Inventory Geriatric Depression Scale older psychiatric outpatients clinical cutoffs 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Evan S. Kogan
    • 1
  • Robert I. Kabacoff
    • 1
  • Michel Hersen
    • 1
  • Vincent B. Van Hasselt
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Psychological StudiesNova Southeastern UniversityFort Lauderdale

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