Journal of Archaeological Research

, Volume 4, Issue 3, pp 165–202 | Cite as

Recent ceramic analysis: 2. Composition, production, and theory

  • Prudence M. Rice
Article

Abstract

This is the second of two articles reviewing the burgeoning literature on recent ceramic analysis. The first (Journal of Archaeological Research, Vol. 4, No. 2, 1996) (pp. 133–163) surveyed functional and stylistic analyses and pottery origins. This article reviews compositional investigations and studies of pottery production, both of which have flourished in a period of heightened examination of specific techniques, assumptions, and concepts, such as standardization. In addition, researchers are exploring new analytical methods as well as approaches to “ceramic theory.” The review closes with a series of observations and critiques of current directions.

Key words

pottery analysis composition production ethnoarchaeology 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Prudence M. Rice
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Anthropology, Mailcode 4502Southern Illinois UniversityCarbondale

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