Journal of Medical Systems

, Volume 1, Issue 1, pp 3–21 | Cite as

A large-scale professionally oriented medical information system — Five years later

  • Ralph J. Watson
  • Michael A. Jenkin
Articles

Abstract

Success is the word used most often to describe El Camino Hospital's computerized medical information system. Operational since 1972, the system has gained total support from virtually all hospital personnel. Physicians, nurses, and administrative people use the system routinely as part of their day-to-day activities. HEW-sponsored studies have heralded the system for its impact on improving patient care and containing costs. The following paper is an overview of the system from installation to the present. It tells of the vast information available to hospital professionals through simple lightpen selections on a CRT screen, how it handles most manual activities, how it reduces errors, and how it replaces the nurses' Kardex files. Automated systems technology is vital to the future of health care, and it is a valuable tool for enhancing the quality of patient care and improving the use of labor resources. This paper further gives an important insight into other benefits offered to all hospitals by the advent of systems such as the one at El Camino.

Keywords

Health Care Information System Patient Care Manual Activity System Technology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Norwood, D. D., Hawkins, R. E., Gall, J. E., Watson, R. J., and Cook, M., Information system benefits hospital, improves patient care.Hospitals 50:79–83. 1976.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Barrett, J. P., Barnum, R. A., Gordon, B. B., and Pesut, R. N.Evaluation of the Implementation of a Medical Information System in a General Community Hospital. Final Report, December 19, 1975, Battelle Columbus Laboratories, Contract HSM 110-73-331, Department of Health, Education and Welfare, Health Resources Administration, National Center for Health Services Research. NTIS Publication No. 248340.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Gall, J. E., Norwood, D. D., Cook, M., Fleming, J., Rydell, R. and Watson, R. J.Demonstration and Evaluation of a Total Hospital Information System. Final Project Report, December 1975. Contract No. HSM 110-71-128, Department of Health, Education and Welfare, Health Resources Administration, National Center for Health Services Research. NTIS Publication No. 262106.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Feldstein, Martin S.,The Rising Cost of Hospital Care, National Center for Health Services Research and Development Information Resources Press, Washington, D.C., 1971.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Watson, R. J., Medical staff response to a computerized medical information system with direct physician interface.Proceedings of Medinfo '74, Stockholm, August 1974.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Cook, M., and McDowell, W., Changing to an automated information system.Am J. Nurs. 75:46–51, 1975.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Hawkins, R. E., Introduction of a user-oriented THIS into a community hospital setting — Introductory agents and their roles.Proceedings of Medinfo '74, Stockholm, August 1974.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ralph J. Watson
    • 1
  • Michael A. Jenkin
  1. 1.El Camino HospitalMountain View

Personalised recommendations