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Journal of Quantitative Criminology

, Volume 10, Issue 4, pp 343–360 | Cite as

A comparison of weighted and unweighted analyses in the national Crime Victimization Survey

  • Sharon L. Lohr
  • Joanna Liu
Article

Abstract

The National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) data tapes include several variables of weights that reflect how many households or persons are represented by a given data record. While these sampling weights are crucial for estimating overall victimization rates, they do not have as much of an effect on methodological models, because weights in the NCVS are used primarily in ratio estimation adjustments and to compensate for a relatively low nonresponse rate. The general use of weights is discussed, and several examples are given that indicate that although there may be some differences in the coefficients, the basic conclusions drawn from the models are the same with or without weights. It is recommended that weighted analyses in the NCVS be used primarily as a tool in model development.

Key words

sampling weights logistic regression victimization reporting crime to police 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sharon L. Lohr
    • 1
  • Joanna Liu
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of MathematicsArizona State UniversityTempe
  2. 2.Unisys CorporationSalt Lake City

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