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Laboratory model ecosystem studies of the degradation and fate of radiolabeled tri-, tetra-, and pentachlorobiphenyl compared with DDE

  • Robert L. Metcalf
  • James R. Sanborn
  • Po-Yung Lu
  • Donald Nye
Article

Abstract

Radiolabeled tri-, tetra-, and pentachlorobiphenyls (PCB) and DDE were studied in a laboratory model ecosystem for degradation pathways, and biomagnification in alga, snail, mosquito, and fish. Trichlorobiphenyl was degraded in all the organisms of the model ecosystem much more rapidly than tetrachloro- and pentachlorobiphenyl. Pentachlorobiphenyl was approximately as persistent as DDE. There was a linear relationship between lipid/water partition and ecological magnification and between water solubility and ecological magnification. No evidence of conversion of DDE to PCB was detected.

Keywords

Linear Relationship Water Solubility Degradation Pathway Model Ecosystem Laboratory Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert L. Metcalf
    • 1
    • 2
  • James R. Sanborn
    • 1
    • 2
  • Po-Yung Lu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Donald Nye
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Entomology and Environmental Studies InstituteUniversity of IllinoisUSA
  2. 2.Illinois Natural History SurveyUrbana-ChampaignUrbana

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