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Establishment of reentry intervals for organophosphate-treated cotton fields based on human data: III. 12 to 72 hours post-treatment exposure to monocrotophos, ethyl- and methyl parathion

Abstract

Five human volunteers entered methyl parathion, ethyl parathion, or monocrotophos treated cotton fields for five-hr exposure periods when the residues of the respective pesticides had aged 12 hr, 24 and 48 hr, and 48 and 72 hr. Foliage residues of methyl parathion disappeared fastest, those of monocrotophos slowest. Personal exposure to pesticide was evaluated from contamination of skin, clothing, and ambient air, while actual absorption of chemical was assessed from pesticide concentration in blood, urinary metabolite excretion, and effects on blood cholinesterase activities. There was good correspondence between magnitudes of foliar residue, estimates of personal contamination, and measures of chemical absorption. Field exposures caused no symptoms or clinical signs of organophosphate poisoning and depressed averaged blood cholinesterase activities by no more than 14% of pre-exposure levels.

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Additional information

Contribution to Regional Project W-45, “Residues of Selected Pesticides and Related Chemicals in the Agricultural Environment—Their Nature, Distribution, Persistence, and Toxicological Implications.” University of Arizona Agricultural Experiment Station #2281.

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Ware, G.W., Morgan, D.P., Estesen, B.J. et al. Establishment of reentry intervals for organophosphate-treated cotton fields based on human data: III. 12 to 72 hours post-treatment exposure to monocrotophos, ethyl- and methyl parathion. Arch. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 3, 289–306 (1975). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02220742

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Keywords

  • Parathion
  • Urinary Metabolite
  • Methyl Parathion
  • Personal Exposure
  • Field Exposure