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Competition between strains ofBradyrhizobium japonicum for nodulation of soybeans at different nitrogen fertilizer levels

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Abstract

Competitive abilities of 3 strains ofBradyrhizobium japonicum (E104, E109, E110) for nodulation of soybean (Glycine max) at increasing nitrogen fertilizer levels were studied. Dry weight of plants nodulated by strain E110 were depressed at 10 g N·m−2, the highest fertilizer level, even when mixed with strain E109. Strain E104 alone or mixed with E109 increased dry matter production. Strain E110 formed many dually infected nodules with strain E104 present but not with strain E109. However, strain E104 formed nodules containing strain E109. Neither strain E110 or E109 produced bacteriocin, so the incompatibility of these two strains had to be due to another reason. Strain E104 successfully competes with strain E109 but not with E110 at 10 g N·m−2. It is concluded that strain E110 dominates the symbiotic relationships even if other strains are also present in the nodules. However, at a high N-fertilizer level strain E110 decreases the plant yield in contrast to E104, which could be recommended as inoculant at increased levels of soluble soil-N.

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Mårtensson, A.M., Brutti, L. & Ljunggren, H. Competition between strains ofBradyrhizobium japonicum for nodulation of soybeans at different nitrogen fertilizer levels. Plant Soil 117, 219–225 (1989). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02220715

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Key words

  • bacteriocin
  • Bradyrhizobium japonicum
  • ELISA
  • Glycine max
  • inoculation
  • nitrogen fertilization
  • nodulation
  • soybean
  • strain competition