Agriculture and Human Values

, Volume 6, Issue 3, pp 4–12 | Cite as

Toward a knowledge of local knowledge and its importance for agricultural RD&E

  • Constance M. McCorkle

Abstract

Local knowledge (both technological and sociological) and communication systems represent a logical starting point and a rich body of resources for successful agricultural research, development, and extension (RD&E). Drawing upon concrete examples from Asia, Africa, and Latin America, this essay presents an overview of definitions, topics, and applications of local knowledge in agricultural RD&E. Also noted are caveats, future research and training needs, and human values issues related to the study and utilization of local knowledge systems and their products.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Constance M. McCorkle

There are no affiliations available

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