Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 18, Issue 4, pp 505–524 | Cite as

A study of intellectual abilities in high-functioning people with autism

  • A. J. Lincoln
  • E. Courchesne
  • B. A. Kilman
  • R. Elmasian
  • M. Allen
Article

Abstract

This research extends previous research regarding the intellectual functioning of autistic individuals on standardized measures of intelligence (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised and the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised). In Study I 33 individuals with autism who closely fit the DSM-III criteria were studied. Clear evidence was found that differentiates these individuals' verbal intellectual processes from their visual-motor intellectual abilities. Principal components analysis was used to examine the interrelationship among the various intellectual abilities which such tests of intelligence measure. In Study II the intellectual abilities of a group of autistic 8-to 12-year-olds were compared to age-matched groups of children with receptive developmental language disorder, dysthymic disorder, or oppositional disorder. The intellectual abilities of autistic children were significantly different from the other groups of children.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. J. Lincoln
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • E. Courchesne
    • 1
    • 2
  • B. A. Kilman
    • 3
  • R. Elmasian
    • 1
  • M. Allen
    • 1
  1. 1.Neuropsychology Research LaboratoryChildren's Hospital Research Center, San DiegoSan DiegoUSA
  2. 2.Neurosciences DepartmentUniversity of California at San DiegoSan DiegoUSA
  3. 3.San Diego Regional Center for the Developmentally DisabledSan DiegoUSA

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