Population and Environment

, Volume 15, Issue 1, pp 7–41 | Cite as

Population, resources, and environment: Implications of human behavioral ecology for conservation

  • Bobbi S. Low
  • Joel T. Heinen
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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bobbi S. Low
    • 1
  • Joel T. Heinen
    • 1
  1. 1.Evolution and Human Behavior Program, School of Natural ResourcesUniversity of MichiganAnn Arbor

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