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Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 21, Issue 4, pp 381–406 | Cite as

Rett syndrome: A review of current knowledge

  • Rick Van Acker
Article

Abstract

Rett syndrome was first described in 1966 by Andreas Rett. To date, this syndrome has been reported only to afflict females. The disorder is characterized by a progressive loss of cognitive and motor skills as well as the development of stereotypic hand movements, occurring after an apparently normal 6 to 18 months of development. Although Rett syndrome is thought to afflict as many as 10,000 girls in the United States, fewer than 1,200 have been identified thus far. A lack of awareness of this disorder is thought to play a critical role in the failure to differentially diagnose this syndrome. The present article presents a review of our current knowledge concerning this disorder. Information is provided related to the clinical manifestations, etiology, prevalence, pathogenesis, and treatment of the Rett syndrome.

Keywords

United States Critical Role Clinical Manifestation Present Article Current Knowledge 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rick Van Acker
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Education M/C 147University of Illinois at ChicagoChicago

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