World Journal of Urology

, Volume 15, Issue 3, pp 165–171 | Cite as

Current aspects of epidemiology and nutrition in urinary stone disease

  • A. Hesse
  • R. Siener

Abstract

Current examples for the development of urinary stone disease are discussed by means of data from the literature and our own studies. Urinary stone disease has gained increasing significance due to changes in living conditions, i.e., industrialization and malnutrition. Changes in prevalence and incidence, the occurrence of stone types and stone location, and the manner of stone removal are explained. The importance of nutrition in the prevention of calcium oxalate stone disease is discussed in terms of fluid intake, calcium and oxalate metabolism, and dietary fat intake. The results of a study on a standardized mixed diet or an ovo-lactovegetarian diet show that well-balanced nutrition with consecutive high intake of fluids leads to a significant decrease in the risk for urinary stone formation (calculated as relative supersaturation with calcium oxalate by the computer program EQUIL).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Hesse
    • 1
  • R. Siener
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Experimental Urology, Department of UrologyUniversity of BonnBonnGermany

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