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Contemporary Family Therapy

, Volume 16, Issue 4, pp 301–314 | Cite as

Aiding the parolee adjustment process: A systemic perspective on assessment

  • Chuck Romig
  • Carol Gruenke
Clinical Issues

Abstract

Addressing the mental health needs of inmates and parolees is a complex process. The authors have found a family systems approach useful in conceptualizing the complexities of the adjustment process faced by parolees. The inmate/parolee is embedded in a number of complex systems that present difficulties related to boundary maintenance, hierarchy struggles, and family-of-origin loyalties. The authors suggest crucial areas for assessment and some common dysfunctional systems dynamics that are encountered.

Key words

Assessment family and parolee parolee adjustment 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chuck Romig
    • 1
  • Carol Gruenke
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Administration Counseling, Educational and School PsychologyWichita State UniversityWichita
  2. 2.Wichita

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