Neuroleptic malignant syndrome and catatonia

A report of three cases
  • Michele Raja
  • Maria Concetta Altavista
  • Stefano Cavallari
  • Loredana Lubich
Original Articles

Summary

In a series of 1007 consecutively admitted patients, 3 cases of neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) were identified (0.3%). All three patients were affected by mood disorders with congruent psychotic features, had shown catatonia just before the onset of NMS, and had been treated with low neuroleptic doses. All of them presented low serum iron levels. The relationship between NMS and catatonia and possible therapeutic decisions are discussed.

Key words

Neuroleptic malignant syndrome Catatonia 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michele Raja
    • 1
  • Maria Concetta Altavista
    • 1
  • Stefano Cavallari
    • 1
  • Loredana Lubich
    • 1
  1. 1.Ospedale “Santo Spirito”, Dipartimento di salute mentale USL RM11Servizio Psichiatrico di Diagnosi e CuraRomeItaly

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