Apolipoprotein E-4 gene dose in clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease: prevalence, plasma cholesterol levels and cerebrovascular change

  • C. Czech
  • H. Förstl
  • F. Hentschel
  • U. Mönning
  • C. Besthorn
  • C. Geiger-Kabisch
  • H. Sattel
  • C. Masters
  • K. Beyreuther
Short Communication

Summary

The prevalence of the apolipoprotein E-4 allele (ApoE-4) was significantly higher in a referral population of 40 patients with clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease than in a sample of non-demented elderly controls (P<0.01). The highest plasma cholesterol levels were found in demented patients homozygotic for Apo E-4, but no significant increases of glucose, triglycerides and thyroxine or of leuko-araiosis and brain infarcts were verified in this preliminary study.

Key words

Alzheimer's disease Apolipoprotein E-4 Cholesterol Leuko-araiosis cerebral infarct 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Czech
    • 1
  • H. Förstl
    • 2
  • F. Hentschel
    • 2
  • U. Mönning
    • 1
  • C. Besthorn
    • 2
  • C. Geiger-Kabisch
    • 2
  • H. Sattel
    • 2
  • C. Masters
    • 1
  • K. Beyreuther
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Molecular BiologyHeidelbergGermany
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryCentral Institute of Mental HealthMannheimGermany

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