Increased serum soluble interleukin-2 receptors in schizophrenic monozygotic twins

  • Mark Hyman Rapaport
  • E. Fuller Torrey
  • Cathy G. McAllister
  • David L. Nelson
  • David Pickar
  • Steven M. Paul
Original Articles

Summary

There is a confusing history of immune findings associated with schizophrenia. At least some of these discrepant results may be artifacts caused by heterogeneity. In an attempt to decrease heterogeneity, we studied three groups of monozygotic twins who were either discordant for schizophrenia, concordant and ill, or concordant and well. This comparison minimizes environmental and genetic variance, and heightens differences that are actually due to the disorder. Overall, schizophrenic subjects had higher levels of serum soluble interleukin-2 receptors (SIL-2Rs) than unaffected individuals (480.8, SD 238.6 U/ml vs 380.9, SD 170.6 U/ml;F=5.256,df=1.61,P=0.02). When data from discordant and concordant twin groups were analysed separately, both the discordant ill twins (P=0.06) and concordant ill twin pairs (P=0.08) showed trends towards higher serum SIL-2R levels than their respective control groups. These data contribute to the growing body of evidence that immune activation is associated with some forms of schizophrenia.

Key words

Immunology Schizophrenia Twins Soluble interleukin-2 receptors 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark Hyman Rapaport
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
    • 2
    • 5
    • 6
  • E. Fuller Torrey
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
    • 2
    • 5
    • 6
  • Cathy G. McAllister
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
    • 2
    • 5
    • 6
  • David L. Nelson
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
    • 2
    • 5
    • 6
  • David Pickar
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
    • 2
    • 5
    • 6
  • Steven M. Paul
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
    • 2
    • 5
    • 6
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of California, San Diego School of MedicineLa JollaUSA
  2. 2.Psychiatric Service of the San Diego Veterans Affairs Medical CenterSan DiegoUSA
  3. 3.The Clinical Brain Disorders Branch of the Intramural Research Program, National Institute of Mental HealthSt. Elisabeth HospitalWashington DCUSA
  4. 4.The Department of PsychiatryUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  5. 5.The Clinical Therapeutics BranchNational Institute of Mental HealthBethesdaUSA
  6. 6.The Division of Intramural ResearchNational Institute of Mental HealthBethesdaUSA

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