Advertisement

Distraction resulting from disease related words in alcohol-dependent inpatients: a controlled dichotic listening study

  • F. Stetter
  • K. Ackermann
  • E. Scherer
  • H. Schmid
  • Eckart R. Straube
  • K. Mann
Short Communication

Abstract

To test whether alcoholics develop an information processing bias towards disease-related stimuli, 30 alcoholic inpatients and 30 controls were administered a dichotic listening task. Three different stimulus types were presented to the right (ignored) channel: neutral words, rare neutral words and alcohol-related words. The hypothesized information processing bias should cause patients to make disproportionally more shadowing errors in the third condition. An ANOVA revealed a significant condition effect (P<0.001), a tendency towards a group effect (P=0.09) and a significant interaction (P<0.01) in the expected direction. There was a marked increase of errors in alcoholics when disease-related stimuli were presented compared to the neutral conditions and to the controls.

Key words

Alcoholism Dichotic listening Neutropsychology Cognitive psychology Semantic network 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Blum GS (1989) A computer model for unconscious spread of anxiety linked inhibition in cognitive networks. Behav Sci 34:16–45Google Scholar
  2. Bower GH (1981) Mood and memory. Am Psychol 36:129–148Google Scholar
  3. Burgess IS, Jones LM, Robertson SA, Radcliffe WN, Emerson E (1981) The degree of control exerted by phobic and non-phobic verbal stimuli over the recognition behaviour of phobic and non-phobic subjects. Behav Res Ther 19:233–243Google Scholar
  4. Collins AM, Loftus EF (1975) A spreading-activation theory of semantic processing. Psychol Rev 82:407–428Google Scholar
  5. Feuerlein W, Ringer C, Küfner H, Antons K (1977) Diagnose des Alkoholismus: Der Münchner Alkoholismustest (MALT). Münch Med Wochenschr 119:1275–1282Google Scholar
  6. Foa EB, McNally RC (1986) Sensitivity to feared stimuli in obsessive-compulsives: A dichotic listening analysis. Cogn Ther Res 10:477–485Google Scholar
  7. Hill AB, Paynter S (1992) Alcohol dependence and semantic priming of alcohol-related words. Person Individ Differ 13:745–750Google Scholar
  8. Legarda JJ, Bradley BP, Sartory G (1990): Effects of drug-related cues in current and former opiate users. J Psychophysiol 4:25–31Google Scholar
  9. Lehrl S (1977) Mehrfach-Wahl-Wortschatz-Intelligenztest MWT-B. Perimed, ErlangenGoogle Scholar
  10. Matthews A, MacLeod C (1986) Discrimination of threat cues without awareness in anxiety states. J Abnorm Psychol 95:131–138Google Scholar
  11. Meier A (1967) Deutsche Sprachstatistik. 2nd ed. Olms HeidelbergGoogle Scholar
  12. Quillian MR (1967) Word concepts: A theory and simulation of some basic semantic capabilities. Behav Sci 12:410–430Google Scholar
  13. Ruoff A (1981) Häufigkeitswörterbuch gesprochener Sprache. Max Niemeyer Verlag, TübingenGoogle Scholar
  14. Straube ER, Germer CK (1979) Dichotic shadowing and selective attention to word meaning in schizophrenia. J Abnorm Psychol 88:346–353Google Scholar
  15. Stetter F, Chaluppa C, Ackermann K, Straube ER, Mann K (1994) Alcoholics' selective processing of alcohol related words and cognitive performance on a Stroop task. Eur Psychiatry 9:71–76Google Scholar
  16. Trandel DV, McNally RJ (1987) Perception of threat cues in post-traumatic stress disorder: Semantic processing without awareness? Behav Res Ther 25:469–476Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Stetter
    • 1
  • K. Ackermann
    • 1
  • E. Scherer
    • 1
  • H. Schmid
    • 1
  • Eckart R. Straube
    • 2
  • K. Mann
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of TübingenTübingenGermany
  2. 2.Institute of PsychologyUniversity of JenaJenaGermany

Personalised recommendations