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The obsession with settlement rates

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References

  1. Bush, R.A.B. and J.P. Folger. 1994.The promise of mediation. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

  2. Center for Dispute Settlement. 1992. National standards for court-connected mediation programs. Washington: CDS.

  3. Galanter, M. and M. Cahill. 1995. “Most cases settle”: Judicial promotion and regulation of settlements.Stanford Law Review 46: 1339–1391.

  4. Goldberg, S., F. Sander, and N. Rogers. 1992.Dispute resolution: Negotiation, mediation, and other processes. 2nd ed. Boston: Little, Brown.

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  6. Keilitz, S., editor. 1994.National symposium on court-connected dispute resolution research: A report on current research findings — implications for courts and future research needs. Williamsburg, Va: National Center of State Courts.

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His recent publication include (with Stephen B. Goldberg and Nancy H. Rogers) the second edition ofDispute Resolution (Boston: Little, Brown, 1992).

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Sander, F.E.A. The obsession with settlement rates. Negot J 11, 329–332 (1995). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02187856

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